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The Green Mile, Part 1: The Two Dead Girls

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They were sisters, and the picture-perfect image of innocence. No one understood their brutal deaths, not even the man who killed them. But John Coffey is about to gain a new insight, about his life in prison, and about the one man who will walk him down that green mile . . . toward destiny. Prepare yourself for Stephen King's boldest exercise in nerve-twisting They were sisters, and the picture-perfect image of innocence. No one understood their brutal deaths, not even the man who killed them. But John Coffey is about to gain a new insight, about his life in prison, and about the one man who will walk him down that green mile . . . toward destiny. Prepare yourself for Stephen King's boldest exercise in nerve-twisting suspense. A multi-part serial novel that begins on death row and goes on from there to realms of revelation that make death seem sweet. This is Stephen King's most irresistible journey ever. To be continued . . . --back cover


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They were sisters, and the picture-perfect image of innocence. No one understood their brutal deaths, not even the man who killed them. But John Coffey is about to gain a new insight, about his life in prison, and about the one man who will walk him down that green mile . . . toward destiny. Prepare yourself for Stephen King's boldest exercise in nerve-twisting They were sisters, and the picture-perfect image of innocence. No one understood their brutal deaths, not even the man who killed them. But John Coffey is about to gain a new insight, about his life in prison, and about the one man who will walk him down that green mile . . . toward destiny. Prepare yourself for Stephen King's boldest exercise in nerve-twisting suspense. A multi-part serial novel that begins on death row and goes on from there to realms of revelation that make death seem sweet. This is Stephen King's most irresistible journey ever. To be continued . . . --back cover

30 review for The Green Mile, Part 1: The Two Dead Girls

  1. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    "Your name is John Coffey." "Yes sir boss, like the drink, only not spelled the same way." Who doesn't love the gifted giant of a man in THE GREEN MILE? When I purchased THE TWO DEAD GIRLS, I had already read THE GREEN MILE so I knew what was coming, but thought perhaps it would be a more detailed account of the incident....or should I say horror of what happened to the two young sisters, but it is indeed pretty much the same....if memory serves. One part I didn't recall though was mention of a woman ever being detainedMILE? "Your name is John Coffey." "Yes sir boss, like the drink, only not spelled the same way." Who doesn't love the gifted giant of a man in THE GREEN MILE? When I purchased THE TWO DEAD GIRLS, I had already read THE GREEN MILE so I knew what was coming, but thought perhaps it would be a more detailed account of the incident....or should I say horror of what happened to the two young sisters, but it is indeed pretty much the same....if memory serves. One part I didn't recall though was mention of a woman ever being detained on the mile....in the novel or movie. In the Forward, KING tells how he came to write THE GREEN MILE in paperback episodes in the 19th century chapbook style of Dickens, that he always loved stories told in this manner giving the reader time to figure out what would happen next....with no flipping ahead. Appalled as a young boy of 12, he tells about catching his mother peeking at the end of an Agatha Christie novel telling him, "sometimes she just couldn't resist the temptation." Anyway, it was good to revisit the mile, the gentle giant John Coffey....not spelled the same....nasty old Percy, Mr. Jingles, and, of course, Old Sparky! If you haven't yet read THE GREEN MILE, you're really missing out! First Published: March, 1996.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ammar

    The start of a modern classic. Simple , smart, and breathtaking.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    Movies! I remember watching this one when it came out! It's so odd to be reading the tale a few decades later without even having a desire to watch the movie. :) It turns out that Hanks with a prostate problem was NOT the most memorable part of the movie. It's the mouse, of course. The main character is always the mouse, and I'm not even referring to Steamboat Willie. The short story is mild and reflective, even with the scent of rape, murder and peppermint, which is odd, a Movies! I remember watching this one when it came out! It's so odd to be reading the tale a few decades later without even having a desire to watch the movie. :) It turns out that Hanks with a prostate problem was NOT the most memorable part of the movie. It's the mouse, of course. The main character is always the mouse, and I'm not even referring to Steamboat Willie. The short story is mild and reflective, even with the scent of rape, murder and peppermint, which is odd, all considered. And yet, it is still quintessential SK.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Erin *Proud Book Hoarder*

    A good set-up for what's later to come. I like the main character and some of the other guards, they seem like realistic characters, although hearing about the urinary tract infection so often made me wince. I'm not a fan of the death penalty and this book helps reinforce some of the reasons why. 'The Green Mile' is aptly named. The scene where they find Coffey holding the girls is sobering - the entire scene from discovering they're missing to finding the result was amazingly written. Since thi A good set-up for what's later to come. I like the main character and some of the other guards, they seem like realistic characters, although hearing about the urinary tract infection so often made me wince. I'm not a fan of the death penalty and this book helps reinforce some of the reasons why. 'The Green Mile' is aptly named. The scene where they find Coffey holding the girls is sobering - the entire scene from discovering they're missing to finding the result was amazingly written. Since this is a start-up book, not much is happening yet other than establishing the structure.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Arah-Lynda

    It was 1996 when I came across this, a happy accident, at my local 7-11, near the bat tree. It is 1932 when we first meet Paul Edgecombe, head screw, and our narrator and walk The Green Mile at Cold Mountain, where men are sent to pay their final due to Old Sparky, the electric chair. It is the year that John Coffey came to Cold Mountain, convicted of brutally raping and killing two, near nine year old twin girls, an enormous man, a mountain in his own right, with wet, dark eyes and It was 1996 when I came across this, a happy accident, at my local 7-11, near the bat tree. It is 1932 when we first meet Paul Edgecombe, head screw, and our narrator and walk The Green Mile at Cold Mountain, where men are sent to pay their final due to Old Sparky, the electric chair. It is the year that John Coffey came to Cold Mountain, convicted of brutally raping and killing two, near nine year old twin girls, an enormous man, a mountain in his own right, with wet, dark eyes and a humble, gentle nature. King’s characterization skills shine here. Percy Wetmore announces his arrival. “ Dead Man Walking” while his own, inner being fairly oozes off the page. I loved the narrator’s voice, and I thought a good deal about what it would be like to have such a job as that. And what to hell is up with that mouse? King had me; the purchase of the second book in this series was no accident.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bookish Devil

    My First Stephen King Novel and I'm glad that I started off with this series. Despite its short length it was very intriguing. And though it ended kind of plainly rather than in a cliffhanger, the theme of the series would definitely pique your interest to read the sequels of the same. :) The setting of the story vaguely reminds me of Shawshank Redemption though.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Adolf Schindler of Books

    It is a fantastic piece of the master Stephen King because the characters are well developed and the plot is amazing.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Philip

    Man, I wish I was in to Stephen King when this came out in serialized fashion. I watched the movie back then, but hadn't read the book. In the past 5 to 10 years, I've started reading King. He's good. He's so good. I guess the good part is, you know how people binge watch TV shows now? I can binge-read these. Yeah. I'll be doing that. One thing to add: in book one, there is a great introduction about books and reading in general.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    No one tells a story quite like Mr. King. Sad, heartbreaking and riveting!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Steph

    A newsletter I love brought this re-release to my attention, and it warms my heart. Back in 1996, Stephen King released The Green Mile in 6 installments. I was too young to read it in '96, but now I can experience the ebook releases as readers originally did, without the ability of skipping ahead. The parts are being released in two week increments so at least you know exactly when the next part will be released. Take note, George RR Martin!!! just kidding. I watched the movie several years ago, A newsletter I love brought this re-release to my attention, and it warms my heart. Back in 1996, Stephen King released The Green Mile in 6 installments. I was too young to read it in '96, but now I can experience the ebook releases as readers originally did, without the ability of skipping ahead. The parts are being released in two week increments so at least you know exactly when the next part will be released. Take note, George RR Martin!!! just kidding. I watched the movie several years ago, but can only vaguely remember it. I have always wanted to read it, so this is the perfect time. This is a great introduction to the story and I already like several characters. 5/5

  11. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    Late to the scene on reading this series. So glad I am finally reading it....In this first section we are introduced to some of the main characters, can't wait to continue with this!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Meigan

    *Cliterary Genius 2017 Reading Challenge, January: Read a Stephen King book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    mina

    I started seeing a lot of King’s books on my feed, and, naturally, I got pulled into the reading mania. Despite the fact that I know that I don’t enjoy his books, I looked up his work and picked a few books that seemed interesting. I decided to read only the first part of the Green mile solely because I knew I wouldn’t finish the whole book if started. There’s just something with King’s books that isn’t for me. It took me 3 days to finish 60 pages, and I finished it only because it was 60 pages and I started seeing a lot of King’s books on my feed, and, naturally, I got pulled into the reading mania. Despite the fact that I know that I don’t enjoy his books, I looked up his work and picked a few books that seemed interesting. I decided to read only the first part of the Green mile solely because I knew I wouldn’t finish the whole book if started. There’s just something with King’s books that isn’t for me. It took me 3 days to finish 60 pages, and I finished it only because it was 60 pages and not the whole book (that would’ve ended dnf-ed). I even finished watching the three hour movie (which was good) before I finished this part, that’s how much trouble I have with King’s works. I’m a bit bummed because movies/series based on his work are amazing and I like them a lot, but books… sadly not for me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Luna Bookish

    The feeling of this book is really haunting. Part one has really set the tone of this serial (6 parts). It depicts a pretty horrendous crime so you know what type of people our narrator is dealing with, but I am thankful that he has not shared more than he has needed to. I really am enjoying the narrators voice, it is oddly calm, but I can tell something big is going to be shown to me. I am going to be jumping into part 2 as soon as I can.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kate Hastings

    No less masterfully crafted or instantly captivating all these years later. My heart’s in it now. Spurred by a wild hair, spontaneous spring cleaning unearthed my copies of these serial novellas...and instantly taken back to the time I devoured each one, I made the mistake of opening—just to take a peek mind you—Two Dead Girls. And there endeth the spring cleaning. #ReRead

  16. 5 out of 5

    Freya Beavis

    I haven’t read a Stephen King book in ages and it’s all flooding back to me how easy his work is to get through! It’s engulfing!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Marc-Antoine

    A great start to a wonderful story.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Original review I wrote at 2:45 AM, exhausted: Very good start to the beginning of "The Green Mile" series. Enjoyed several different parts of the story and the set up for more. Can't wait for two! More thorough review at 7:13 PM, sort of tired: I have really enjoyed the first part of this serial novel. I am also genuinely surprised by how much I've enjoyed the beginning of this book although I am a fan of the movie. I guess the reason I am so surprised is because I've always written Original review I wrote at 2:45 AM, exhausted: Very good start to the beginning of "The Green Mile" series. Enjoyed several different parts of the story and the set up for more. Can't wait for two! More thorough review at 7:13 PM, sort of tired: I have really enjoyed the first part of this serial novel. I am also genuinely surprised by how much I've enjoyed the beginning of this book although I am a fan of the movie. I guess the reason I am so surprised is because I've always written Stephen King off as "just a storyteller", which you know is a fine title to have, but I have always thought that because of the write off he was unable to write stories of depth and meaning. Instead, to me, he just wrote stories that captivated people by plot and not by heart... What I've learned from just reading part one is that this is far from being true. There were many moments alone in the first part of this story that caught me to be breathless. The way he has written several characters with their thoughts, feelings, truths, along with his version of the truth as a subtle narrator is fascinating along with being, of course, thought - provoking. I love this book so far and I cannot wait to read more. In all honesty, this could possibly be the best book I've read of the RowRub Reading Club (the book club I'm apart of with my friends). I have so many thoughts and feelings that I hope continue to grow as I read more as well as share with my book club members, family, friends, and, of course, the awesome people of Goodreads!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    I love this story, but I have never sat down to actually read it through before now. I am actually pretty surprised at how faithful the movie adaptation is to the story so far. I recall quite a bit of narration in the movie, but I know they do not go to the depths the books do. There is a bit more nebulous an idea of a solid timeline in the books than in the movie, which I think is probably more true to the idea of the story, since Paul is telling us the story from the standpoint of an older man I love this story, but I have never sat down to actually read it through before now. I am actually pretty surprised at how faithful the movie adaptation is to the story so far. I recall quite a bit of narration in the movie, but I know they do not go to the depths the books do. There is a bit more nebulous an idea of a solid timeline in the books than in the movie, which I think is probably more true to the idea of the story, since Paul is telling us the story from the standpoint of an older man looking back over his life. As he writes, he is sure of the details, but the 'when' is the hardest part for him to maintain. We see this distinctly in his details of Coffey's crime, that he uncovers only years after the story takes place. So rather than seeing the story as he saw it then, it has been altered by his later knowledge and retrospective analysis of himself and his men during that time.

  20. 5 out of 5

    AJ Gray Douglas

    The first episode of the green mile was very interesting. We could grasp how the scenery looked like. And the main character, Paul, was extremely loving due to his raw personality. The aspect that bothered me most was the fact that he would constantly talk about his urinal infection (which didn't bring much to the story in my opinion). Otherwise, we could really understand death sentences and how they affected the guards. For those reasons, I ended up giving this book a 4,00.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mom2triplets04

    This is book 1 of a series and only 100 pages long. I already saw the movie so I knew what was going to happen. It's heartbreaking what happened to the little girls.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    it's awful true story . scary .

  23. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I've always been a fan of the 'Green Mile.' I've always been a fan of the movie, and have watched it several times since I was a teenager. When I saw this book, and it said 'part one', I started reading it. It is basically almost a carbon copy of the movie, aside of the part of Paul being an old man at the beginning and talking to Elaine. That's something they put in purely for the movie. The book is written in the first person, Paul, surrounding the events of John Coffey. Interestingly, as much I've always been a fan of the 'Green Mile.' I've always been a fan of the movie, and have watched it several times since I was a teenager. When I saw this book, and it said 'part one', I started reading it. It is basically almost a carbon copy of the movie, aside of the part of Paul being an old man at the beginning and talking to Elaine. That's something they put in purely for the movie. The book is written in the first person, Paul, surrounding the events of John Coffey. Interestingly, as much as it is like the movie, different people say certain lines that others did in the movie. For example, in the office, Paul is the one that says 'Monstrous big' instead of Brutal. His meeting with the warden happen in the warden's office instead of out in the yard when the warden came to talk to Paul about Percy being ordered off the mile. That, and certain things take place in a different order. For example, he's very up front about the idea that John Coffey was the last execution that he and Brutal took part in, as you learn at the very end of the movie. Also, you learn very early on that John Coffey did walk the green mile, and was executed. You learn that within the first eight chapters of the book. Aside that, the movie really cut nothing out. It changed the events order and sometimes the place, but it is essentially a carbon copy of what happened in the movie. Can't read to wait part 2. I give it 4 stars.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Donna ( Momsbookcollection )

    This was my first Stephen King book to read! mainly got it cause it was short and if i liked it i would get the rest of the series!!!! But i'm not ruling out that i hated it or didn't like it, my two star is that i thought it was an alright read but it wasn't for me. Which in my case i might have missed something while reading it maybe but when i read the title The Two Dead Girls and read that no one understood the deaths of the girls not even the man who killed them i was hoping to really enjoy This was my first Stephen King book to read! mainly got it cause it was short and if i liked it i would get the rest of the series!!!! But i'm not ruling out that i hated it or didn't like it, my two star is that i thought it was an alright read but it wasn't for me. Which in my case i might have missed something while reading it maybe but when i read the title The Two Dead Girls and read that no one understood the deaths of the girls not even the man who killed them i was hoping to really enjoy know what happened and why he didn't know but they only explained what happened and then it was more onto the mouse and the guy that is telling the story which was an officer that put the man in Old Sparky!! Like i said though i probably have missed something maybe but i just don't think this series is my cup of tea, or my cup of rum really.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    Reading this series with a GR book group. We are reading one book a month as it was originally published. I have seen the movie so many times but never read the series. Absolutely perfect Stephen King. Descriptions so vivid and beautifully written. Can't believe I never read this!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    Neat premise with the installments - going to read them as they were meant!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    The first book of 6 of The Green Mile!! This book only gripped me in the middle. Found beginning and end kind of blah!! Hope it picks up in the next book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Max

    This was a certainly interesting book. Its plot line didn't make much since. I mean it progressed over the book but I think the reason it was written was as a filler story. The way it gives you the information though in a very interesting way. If you make a filler story I think this story is how you make one. So it was a very weird story but a very interesting read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    This first installment is intriguing with its colorful characters and foreboding storyline. King has a knack for plunging his readers into a captivating plot. I imagine I would have been anxious for the next installment if I had read this when it was first published. *Stephen King chose to publish The Green Mile in a Dickensian format in which the six separate paperbacks that comprise the novel were published on a monthly basis beginning in March, 1996.

  30. 4 out of 5

    chloe

    I picked the 6 part chapbooks up on a whim in a used book store and read this first instalment on the bus home. Mannn is King a good writer. Everything was gripping; the story, the characterisation, the narrator, the setting, even the eerie cover art. The mood is so grim/ dingy in a way that made me lament the misery people experience on death row (especially during the Great Depression) and reaffirmed my opposition to capital punishment (even though some kind of punition is obviously due when d I picked the 6 part chapbooks up on a whim in a used book store and read this first instalment on the bus home. Mannn is King a good writer. Everything was gripping; the story, the characterisation, the narrator, the setting, even the eerie cover art. The mood is so grim/ dingy in a way that made me lament the misery people experience on death row (especially during the Great Depression) and reaffirmed my opposition to capital punishment (even though some kind of punition is obviously due when deserved). The electric chair (“Old Sparky”) sounds like a horrible way to go and you can really feel the toll it takes on Paul (the narrator) as a screw. It was interesting what he said about the real duty of a screw being that of getting the inmates in the dreaded block E to “talk,” almost as if playing the role of a shrink. Because of this, a weird sense of empathy is felt by Paul (and the reader) for the inmates, even when their heinous crimes are blatantly made known. The most poignant example is when John Coffey (the raper and murderer of two twin girls) asks whether the lights will remain on during the night due to a fear of the dark. Along those lines, King does a great job of showing not only the brutality of the prisoners, but their humanity. The scene of Coffey distraught with regret as he rocks back and forth holding the limp, bloody bodies of his victims is chilling. Ahhhh, this was such a thrilling set-up for the rest of the series, which I’m eager to devour. Also, on a total side note, I don’t see how Paul’s urinary infection added to the story...idk maybe it will come into play later? Oh, and don’t get me started on Delacroix’s grieving mouse (so sad).

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