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Dracula's Guest: By Bram Stoker - Illustrated (Comes with a Free Audiobook)

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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Dracula's Guest is a collection of short stories by Bram Stoker, first published in 1914, two years af How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Dracula's Guest is a collection of short stories by Bram Stoker, first published in 1914, two years after Stoker's death.It is widely believed that "Dracula's Guest" is actually the deleted first chapter from the original Dracula manuscript, which the publisher felt was superfluous to the story. In the preface to the original edition of Dracula's Guest and Other Weird Stories, Stoker's widow Florence wrote, "To his original list of stories in this book, I have added an hitherto unpublished episode from Dracula. It was originally excised owing to the length of the book, and may prove of interest to the many readers of what is considered my husband's most remarkable work." Leslie S. Klinger, who had access to Stoker's original Dracula manuscript[4] while researching his 2008 book The New Annotated Dracula, saw evidence of "Dracula's Guest" having been deleted from the manuscript, such as a deleted sentence of Harker commenting that his throat is "still sore from the licking of the gray wolf's file-like tongue" and the first and second chapters of the finished novel being labeled in the manuscript as "ii"[6] and "iii".[7] Klinger ultimately concludes the following: And so what may we make of ["Dracula's Guest"]? Without the name "Dracula" appearing in the title and [Dracula's] message [sent to the narrator], there would be very little to connect this traveler's tale with [the novel Dracula]. The style is completely different; the narrator shares few characteristics with Jonathan Harker; and the action somehow fails to connect the story set forth in [Dracula]. However, there are numerous references in the [Dracula] Manuscript to some version of the tale eventually published as "Dracula's Guest." Most likely, a different draft — one that identified the narrator as Harker — was included in ... an early version of [the Dracula manuscript]. It may be that Stoker's publisher requested that the book be shortened, or the publisher (or Stoker) may have felt that the "stylistic" aspects of the narrative were more important than its veracity. For whatever reason, the material was excised, and only later did Stoker return to the material and work it into its published form.


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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Dracula's Guest is a collection of short stories by Bram Stoker, first published in 1914, two years af How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Dracula's Guest is a collection of short stories by Bram Stoker, first published in 1914, two years after Stoker's death.It is widely believed that "Dracula's Guest" is actually the deleted first chapter from the original Dracula manuscript, which the publisher felt was superfluous to the story. In the preface to the original edition of Dracula's Guest and Other Weird Stories, Stoker's widow Florence wrote, "To his original list of stories in this book, I have added an hitherto unpublished episode from Dracula. It was originally excised owing to the length of the book, and may prove of interest to the many readers of what is considered my husband's most remarkable work." Leslie S. Klinger, who had access to Stoker's original Dracula manuscript[4] while researching his 2008 book The New Annotated Dracula, saw evidence of "Dracula's Guest" having been deleted from the manuscript, such as a deleted sentence of Harker commenting that his throat is "still sore from the licking of the gray wolf's file-like tongue" and the first and second chapters of the finished novel being labeled in the manuscript as "ii"[6] and "iii".[7] Klinger ultimately concludes the following: And so what may we make of ["Dracula's Guest"]? Without the name "Dracula" appearing in the title and [Dracula's] message [sent to the narrator], there would be very little to connect this traveler's tale with [the novel Dracula]. The style is completely different; the narrator shares few characteristics with Jonathan Harker; and the action somehow fails to connect the story set forth in [Dracula]. However, there are numerous references in the [Dracula] Manuscript to some version of the tale eventually published as "Dracula's Guest." Most likely, a different draft — one that identified the narrator as Harker — was included in ... an early version of [the Dracula manuscript]. It may be that Stoker's publisher requested that the book be shortened, or the publisher (or Stoker) may have felt that the "stylistic" aspects of the narrative were more important than its veracity. For whatever reason, the material was excised, and only later did Stoker return to the material and work it into its published form.

30 review for Dracula's Guest: By Bram Stoker - Illustrated (Comes with a Free Audiobook)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    This is not actually a sequel to Dracula but a collection of short stories by Stoker. I've written a couple of lines about each of them. Dracula’s Guest: This is part of the original Dracula which was cut to reduce the length. It has very little to do with Dracula (the character and the book) and is a bit of an odd story really. That being said they are so very creepy moments in it. The Judge’s House: A haunted house story which is absolutely fantastic. It’s chilling. The Squaw: A particularly gr This is not actually a sequel to Dracula but a collection of short stories by Stoker. I've written a couple of lines about each of them. Dracula’s Guest: This is part of the original Dracula which was cut to reduce the length. It has very little to do with Dracula (the character and the book) and is a bit of an odd story really. That being said they are so very creepy moments in it. The Judge’s House: A haunted house story which is absolutely fantastic. It’s chilling. The Squaw: A particularly gruesome story involving cats. Predictable but contains some fantastic imagery. The Secret of the Growing Gold: A weird ghost story, which I didn’t like very much. A Gipsy Prophecy: The classic format of characters learning a prophecy and then trying to stop it coming true. It doesn’t do what you expect it to do and this is really pleasing. The Coming of Abel Behenna: Two men fall in love with the same woman. Only one can marry her and it seems they will go to any length to ensure they can have her. The Burial of the Rats: This story confused me. It’s mostly a long chase but I just didn’t get what the point of the story was. Mind you, what the title actually means pretty unpleasant… A Dream of Red Hands: The story of a bad dream and a man desperate to make up for past sins. Not exactly a horror story but it makes you think about whether people should be forgiven for their crimes. Crooken Sands: This begins as a very funny story and then turns into a great little psychological tale. I was beginning to think the stories got worse as they went along but this one was one of the best of the book and a great way to end. Overall it's a great collection of gothic horror stories. In some ways it's very much of it's time with women feeling less important (they mostly faint in these stories), though I found that odd considering Dracula portrays some quite strong female characters. If you want some gothic horror then you can't go far wrong with this collection.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Some will have noticed that I am in the midst of an interesting Dracula binge, allowing both Bram and Dacre Stoker to offer up their own spins on the tale. While poking around for new finds on the topic, I stumbled upon this short story by the elder Stoker. In rural Germany, a man is travelling by coach and chooses to stray off the beaten path. He makes his way to a manor house and into a sizeable cemetery, where one large tombstone catches his eye. With the sound of wolves filling the air, one Some will have noticed that I am in the midst of an interesting Dracula binge, allowing both Bram and Dacre Stoker to offer up their own spins on the tale. While poking around for new finds on the topic, I stumbled upon this short story by the elder Stoker. In rural Germany, a man is travelling by coach and chooses to stray off the beaten path. He makes his way to a manor house and into a sizeable cemetery, where one large tombstone catches his eye. With the sound of wolves filling the air, one such creature soon appears on the scene, as though it felt the need to mark its territory. Alone and in a foreign land at night, our protagonist might have met his match in a lupine enemy, but there’s a twist... read the story to find out a little more! A great addition to anyone who loves Dracula or Stoker’s writing. As I read this piece, I felt as though I had already come across it in the past, though I cannot place where I might have done so. Without tipping my hand too much, the title of the piece might not be as truthful for those who skim through the story, though it does have a deeper meaning if you take the time to think about it. Written in 1914–or at least published at that time—it has quite the feel of the original Dracula story, though any reader who has delved into Dacre Stoker’s sequel to the Dracula piece will see some parallels there as well. The piece flows really well, though it seems to be done just as it is getting started. I’d almost have wanted more, though Stoker does a fine job with his descriptions and build-up. I would say that anyone handed this piece and told to ‘get into’ Dracula with it will likely not return to seek out the classic novel, but there is a definite horror aspect that only Stoker can create. Kudos, Mr. Stoker, for such a great short story. I hope many will take the time to read this after they have invested time in your masterwork on the subject! Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/ A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Char

    I thought this collection was just okay. I enjoyed the story The Judge's House the most. A good rat story is always fun. I was a bit disappointed in this collection. I'm a big fan of Dracula and I guess I just expected more.

  4. 5 out of 5

    classic reverie

    I wanted to read my Halloween stories before or near that day but it really does not matter when one reads a "horror" story. Several years ago I decided to read yearly a horror tale during this time of year. I have read many versions of Dracula like by many different authors and will continue to do so in the future. Bram Stroker's Dracula was my first and seeing this short story, I wanted to read this too. This is an extremely short story which I did not read this version but from "The Greatest I wanted to read my Halloween stories before or near that day but it really does not matter when one reads a "horror" story. Several years ago I decided to read yearly a horror tale during this time of year. I have read many versions of Dracula like by many different authors and will continue to do so in the future. Bram Stroker's Dracula was my first and seeing this short story, I wanted to read this too. This is an extremely short story which I did not read this version but from "The Greatest Ghost and Horror", see "horror" shelf if interested in my highlights. Before I go onto my review, my Delphi Complete Works of Bram Stroker had this interesting introduction into "Dracula's Guest" which I will share. "This collection of short stories was first published in 1914, two years after Stoker’s death. Now, it is widely believed that Dracula’s Guest is actually the deleted first chapter from the original Dracula manuscript, which the publisher deemed superfluous to the story, although some scholars disagree with this belief. In the preface of the collection, Stoker’s wife Florence explains, “To his original list of stories in this book, I have added an hitherto unpublished episode from Dracula. It was originally excised owing to the length of the book, and may prove of interest to the many readers of what is considered my husband’s most remarkable work.” One does not need to read "Dracula" to understand and enjoy this story but it gives you a taste of it. An Englishman visiting Germany wanders by himself onto a burial ground on the night of Walpurgis. Strange and scary things happen which are intensified by Bram Stroker's descriptions.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ângela

    “On the top of the tomb, seemingly driven through the solid marble—for the structure was composed of a few vast blocks of stone—was a great iron spike or stake. On going to the back I saw, graven in great Russian letters: 'The dead travel fast.”

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    I had never heard of this book before, but when I ran across it and saw who the author was, I snatched it up and started reading. What we have here is a series of short stories published by Mrs. Stoker after the passing of her husband. The stories range from the disturbing supernatural tale of “The Judge” to the vampiric title tale of “Dracula’s Guest” some versions of this book include the “Lair of the White Worm” which although it is not one of my favorite of Mr. Stoker’s Cannon, it is still a I had never heard of this book before, but when I ran across it and saw who the author was, I snatched it up and started reading. What we have here is a series of short stories published by Mrs. Stoker after the passing of her husband. The stories range from the disturbing supernatural tale of “The Judge” to the vampiric title tale of “Dracula’s Guest” some versions of this book include the “Lair of the White Worm” which although it is not one of my favorite of Mr. Stoker’s Cannon, it is still a very creepy and disturbing novella. This is a VERY short read, and can be completed in a day without trouble. As with all short story collections some will be more to your taste than others. None really packed the punch of “Dracula” but then few tales do. My personal favorites were “Dracula’s Guest” in which a British fellow fails to head the warning of the locals and ventures into a hellish evening of wolves and the supernatural… and we are left with the feeling that his next venture may prove even worse for him. “The Judge” was also interesting… though I really would have liked for there to be more to this story. A learned man takes up residence in the local haunted mansion to get some peace and quite while studying. He gets more than he bargained for in the end. This was a very interesting and dark tale with “Twilight Zone” or “Tales from the Crypt” written all over it. It is very cinematic in tone and could have been much longer. In all there are tales of vengeance, redemption, the supernatural, pacts with the Devil, angry black cats, beggars run amok, murderers, insanity… if you love the short stories of Edgar Allen Poe, then you really need to pick up this collection. If you have read and re-read Dracula and can’t get enough, then pick up this book… it’s hard to find (my copy came from a used bookstore and it looked like a dog had gone to town on the cover) but it is well worth the hunt.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shaun

    This is a collection of short stories published by Stoker's wife after his death. Though a prolific writer in his own right, Stoker really only had one commercially successful book, his revered classic Dracula. So it's no surprise that the first story in this collection, Dracula's Guest, was also chosen as the anthology's title. Note however, that the other stories, while in the horror/Gothic tale genre, are not Dracula/vampire stories. As is the case with many short story collections, there are s This is a collection of short stories published by Stoker's wife after his death. Though a prolific writer in his own right, Stoker really only had one commercially successful book, his revered classic Dracula. So it's no surprise that the first story in this collection, Dracula's Guest, was also chosen as the anthology's title. Note however, that the other stories, while in the horror/Gothic tale genre, are not Dracula/vampire stories. As is the case with many short story collections, there are stories in this collection that shine and sparkle, or in horror's case, creep and crawl, and others not so much. Some of my favorites included Dracula's Guest, The Squaw, The Gipsy Prophecy, and The Coming of Abel Behenna, which all, in my opinion, approach the genius of Poe and Lovecraft. I especially enjoyed the last two, which were intriguing cautionary tales that I hadn't necessarily expected. In addition to Stoker's famed Dracula, I have also read The Jewel of Seven Stars and the overall writing and themes in this collection are consistent with these other works. I would recommend this to Stoker fans, horror fans, and those who appreciate the writings of Poe and Lovecraft and/or those who are interested in exploring the history of horror and the Gothic tale. The collection can be downloaded for free from the Gutenberg Project.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Charles van Buren

    Stories best read by faint, flickering candlelight Review of free Kindle edition A Public Domain Book ASIN B0084BO094 210 pages An engaging collection of nine short stories by Bram Stoker of DRACULA fame. Some are better than others but I enjoyed all of them. Even the ones featuring foolish protagonists. Dracula's Guest was originally a part of Stoker's novel, DRACULA. His publisher removed it to shorten the lengthy novel. Some two years after Stoker's death it was published as a short story. The nove Stories best read by faint, flickering candlelight Review of free Kindle edition A Public Domain Book ASIN B0084BO094 210 pages An engaging collection of nine short stories by Bram Stoker of DRACULA fame. Some are better than others but I enjoyed all of them. Even the ones featuring foolish protagonists. Dracula's Guest was originally a part of Stoker's novel, DRACULA. His publisher removed it to shorten the lengthy novel. Some two years after Stoker's death it was published as a short story. The novel does not suffer because of the removal of this section and it makes a very good stand alone short story.. It also gives readers something to try as a sample without having to start reading the novel. Dracula may appear in this story in some manifestation but not as the Count. The setting is Germany before the guest, presumably Jonathan Harker, travels on to Dracula's castle. The story is suspenseful with an increasing sense of foreboding. Sightseeing in haunted graveyards on St. Walpurga Eve aka Walpurgis Night is not a recommended pursuit for the arrogantly unwary and unprepared. The Judge's House is considered by many to be Bram Stoker's greatest short story and one of Britain's finest ghost stories. It was first published in the December 5, 1891, special Christmas issue of the Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News weekly magazine. In 1914, it was published in the collection, Dracula's Guest and Other Weird Stories. It has since appeared in many anthologies. The Squaw builds to what is an obviously inevitable conclusion. But the inevitability does not lessen the horror or the impulse of the reader to grab and shake the victim while shouting don't be such an idiot. The Secret of the Growing Gold will remind many of Edgar Allan Poe's, The Tell-Tale Heart, despite the many differences in the plot. Of the remaining five stories, The Burial of the Rats has been made into a movie which bears little resemblance to the story. As I recall the movie had a lot of pretty ladies but the story is superior even though it is obvious that the narrator of the story survived his experience. His gruesome situation, danger and flight is still riveting. It is, however, another story in which I continuously asked, "How can you be so foolish?" If you like horror fiction, these stories are worth reading.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Just Josie

    “The dead travel fast”. So pleasant, and beautifully written. I adore the visual image Stoker so gracefully creates , and find the language quite charming. It’s so different from the books I normally spend my time on, and I can fully understand why Stoker’s literature is considered “classics”. Read: 29/03/2019 1st rating: 4 stars Genre/sub-genres: Classics/suspense/vampire/paranormal Cover: 2 stars POV’s: 1st person Will I recommend: Yes

  10. 5 out of 5

    Wreade1872

    Short story collection. The tales are nicely gruesome in general but a bit flat or too obvious. The last story might be the best and thats more of a horror comedy, but not enough to get it to 3 stars overall. The title story is a discarded piece of Dracula and a good decision to cut it in my opinion.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Oliviu Craznic

    A short story way better than the „Dracula” novel, sometimes included as a first chapter of „Dracula” (though this was, probably, Stoker`s intent, it was also, probably, intended, in fact, for an earlier „Dracula” version, quite different from the one we know - the style is quite different, and the tale stays better on its own; as „Dracula”`s first chapter, it makes little sense and it doest not connect well with the rest of the story). A short story way better than the „Dracula” novel, sometimes included as a first chapter of „Dracula” (though this was, probably, Stoker`s intent, it was also, probably, intended, in fact, for an earlier „Dracula” version, quite different from the one we know - the style is quite different, and the tale stays better on its own; as „Dracula”`s first chapter, it makes little sense and it doest not connect well with the rest of the story).

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ken

    This is actually a short story collection, with the first only featuring a cut section from Dracula. A couple of decent tales, I practically liked the two featuring Rats.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Set in Munich an English traveller has a very eerie experience on an old cemetery of an abandoned village. It is Walpurgis Night. The inscription on the headstone mentioning a female countess leads to Dacre Stoker's Dracul. Can a group of soldiers rescue the hero of this story? Why is the story titled Dracula's Guest? Well written, spooky and quick to read for every Dracula and Dracul fan. Dracula is looming over the pages of this story. Recommended!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Vaishali

    Creepy imagery, but much ado about nothing. A wolf appears three-quarters of the way into the story, but this is also a non-event. The scariest things in this tale are the wind, trees and a lone sepulchre. Again, well-written, but no goal.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Pamellia

    Dracula's Guest by Bram Stoker Published posthumously by his wife Began September 15, Completed September 25 Did not read all the stories Horror Readers, September 22, 2014, Discussion This book consists of unpublished stories written prior to Bram Stoker's death. After he passed to eternal life, his wife decided to publish these stories. I'm not sure why this was done, but in general I tend to think that if an writer wanted something published he would have done it. Apparently most of these stories Dracula's Guest by Bram Stoker Published posthumously by his wife Began September 15, Completed September 25 Did not read all the stories Horror Readers, September 22, 2014, Discussion This book consists of unpublished stories written prior to Bram Stoker's death. After he passed to eternal life, his wife decided to publish these stories. I'm not sure why this was done, but in general I tend to think that if an writer wanted something published he would have done it. Apparently most of these stories had not be completed edited by Stoker himself. We see a lot of the posthumously work this day and age. Seems especially musicians who always fine picked their work (Michael Jackson) are being used in this way. Holographing people so close to when they have past away is simply wrong. Any way, one never knows what the deceased would have wanted...perhaps in some cases they do. Perhaps Stoker and Jackson are up in heaven (or wherever) dancing in celebration of these publications. Perhaps they don't know and don't care. Any way. The stories are short, easy reads and mostly get right to the point of the story. I'm not sure I had a favorite...some of these stories reminded me of E. A. Poe's stories, yet somehow not as spooky. I personally rated the stories overall 3 stars I would recommend this book to lovers of classic and horror

  16. 5 out of 5

    berthamason

    I must confess that I thought this was a sequel to Dracula. It's not. Dracula's Guest is a compilation of short horror stories by Bram Stoker published posthumously by his wife. It's quite decent and it reminded me of Edgar Allan Poe at times. The Judge's House, A Gypsy Prophecy and A Dream of Red Hands are my favourite stories. Good for rainy nights.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Harsh Kumar

    A classic indeed. Not as good as Dracula Though. But I always love a classic one. These short horror stories are much much better than the modern ones I have read. The writes in the 18th and 19th century were more dark and gothic I reckon. Reading such books always gives you a quaint feeling. A feeling as if you are not holding a classic novel or a book but a relic in your hands.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Marwan Emad

    The forever Vampires VS Werewolves war. Wished this was a bit longer tbh.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    A great collection of short stories - most had a fair decent creep factor. Bram Stoker is of course a very entertaining storyteller. Four stars simply because the first story (a shorn off chapter from Dracula) was too abrupt to be of any kind of enjoyment and because the last story in this collection bored me to tears when all the others were so gripping.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    I have always loved the book Dracula (although there are parts of it that drag...) In my opinion Bram Stoker was made to write short stories like the ones in Dracula's Guest. The first one is a piece that was taken from the original manuscript of Dracula for the time constraints of the novel. The others are just pieces from Bram Stoker's mind. They are rather macabre but extremely enjoyable if you have a darker side :) Read this, Edgar Allan Poe, and Ray Bradbury for the best October of your lif I have always loved the book Dracula (although there are parts of it that drag...) In my opinion Bram Stoker was made to write short stories like the ones in Dracula's Guest. The first one is a piece that was taken from the original manuscript of Dracula for the time constraints of the novel. The others are just pieces from Bram Stoker's mind. They are rather macabre but extremely enjoyable if you have a darker side :) Read this, Edgar Allan Poe, and Ray Bradbury for the best October of your life.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tarik Lahyany

    Once again, some mystery is left open. Jonathan has decided to go back to the mountains in Romania discovering that the 'unholy' village there, where count Dracula's Castle lies is forbidden. The count in the previous story has left no trace, only tombs were bolted, as they made sure it happened, after they decided to get back.. What's the story of the school there in the Romanian mountain I need to know!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shayantani Das

    Wha…how???Wait, who…when? Okay, I am confused. Is this a prologue of Dracula or an extended story? The narrator surely isn’t Jonathan Harker, right? [image error]

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amina

    Anything refereing to Dracula freezes the blood in my vains, this wasn't really creepy but when he starts describing the atmosphere in the cemetery and the telegram recieved at the hotel, bad souvenirs from Dracula rose and this alone scared the hell outta me

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Antill

    So as I started reading Dracula's Guest, I quickly realized this wasn't going to be a sequel or a continuation of Dracula. This is simply a passage from the original. I really liked Bram Stoker's Dracula so I didn't mind rereading a bit of it. It's just as I remembered it to be: eerie, dark and creepy.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    Dracula's Guest was referenced in Dracul, in the Author's Notes, so I thought I would check it out. It was removed from the original novel (Dracula) by the editor. It's a creepy little story. I like it, but I think it would have done better in it's original place, in the book, rather than a stand alone story.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Pickle.

    *3.5 stars ‘He is English and therefore adventurous’

  27. 4 out of 5

    Walter VDE

    Nice classic short horror story

  28. 4 out of 5

    Holli

    3.5 stars Overall, I only really liked two stories from this collection: Dracula's Guest and The Gypsy Prophecy. Dracula's Guest - 5 stars This one was actually quite good, and downright creepy. Made all the more so by the dramatic reading audio I listened to as it had sound effects to add to the atmosphere of the reading and a very good narrator. I kind of wish the "real" Dracula book had been written this way. I think I would have enjoyed it a lot more than I did. Rather than it being in letter/j 3.5 stars Overall, I only really liked two stories from this collection: Dracula's Guest and The Gypsy Prophecy. Dracula's Guest - 5 stars This one was actually quite good, and downright creepy. Made all the more so by the dramatic reading audio I listened to as it had sound effects to add to the atmosphere of the reading and a very good narrator. I kind of wish the "real" Dracula book had been written this way. I think I would have enjoyed it a lot more than I did. Rather than it being in letter/journal form, this one was in a narrative and worked far better as a story. I need to go read something happy now. This one gave me a strong case of chills. The Judge's House - 2 stars This one was kind of slow, but still disturbing. Only because of the image of rats it stirred in my mind. I could have lived without this story. The Squaw - 0 stars I didn't like the beginning of this one and refuse to ever finish it. I'll leave it at this. The Secret of the Growing Gold - 2 stars Weird and kind of so-so. An okay story. A Gipsy Prophecy - 4 stars This one was interesting and very strange. I wasn't sure where it was going and it went in an entirely different direction than I expected it to. The Coming of Abel Behenna - 1 star Love triangle story and proved kind of annoying in its seesawing. It was kind of creepy, especially the end, but mostly blah. The Burial of the Rats - N/A After reading several reviews, I decided not have anything to do with this one. A Dream of Red Hands - 4 stars This one almost seemed to be a sequel to The Coming of Abel Behenna, then the man reveals his dream and why it so haunts him and the story gets weirder. Creepy and quite well done. Crooken Sands - 2 stars Meh. An okay story that takes a lot of words to say "beware of vanity."

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mikaela*Bibliomaniac*

    Bram Stoker is one of the best.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Neens Bea

    This book consists of one chapter that was edited out of Dracula, followed by a really rather random collection of short stories with two common denominators - they all have something of the mysterious about them, and they are all easily forgettable. The title of the book is misleading not only itself, but also in terms of the contents as a whole; Dracula doesn't actually feature in the story that lends the book its name (although a note is received from him), and Dracula's Guest, i.e. Jonathan This book consists of one chapter that was edited out of Dracula, followed by a really rather random collection of short stories with two common denominators - they all have something of the mysterious about them, and they are all easily forgettable. The title of the book is misleading not only itself, but also in terms of the contents as a whole; Dracula doesn't actually feature in the story that lends the book its name (although a note is received from him), and Dracula's Guest, i.e. Jonathan Harker, isn't named, and furthermore has yet to become Dracula's guest. Incidentally the book wasn't published by Bram Stoker, but by Stoker's widow, 2 years after his death.

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