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Wyrd Sisters

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Kingdoms wobble, crowns topple and knives flash on the magical Discworld as the statutory three witches meddle in royal politics. The wyrd sisters battle against frightful odds to put the rightful king on the throne. At least, that's what they think...


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Kingdoms wobble, crowns topple and knives flash on the magical Discworld as the statutory three witches meddle in royal politics. The wyrd sisters battle against frightful odds to put the rightful king on the throne. At least, that's what they think...

30 review for Wyrd Sisters

  1. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    How have I never read Terry Pratchett before? He's like ... Shakespeare and Wodehouse and Monty Python all wrapped into one! A student gave me this book while we were studying Macbeth in class. Wyrd Sisters is a sort of parallel story, which manages to poke fun at the play, revere the play, make inside jokes about the play, and ... well, generally turn the play on its head. All the while, you, the reader, get to feel very smart and superior for getting all the jokes and allusions. How have I never read Terry Pratchett before? He's like ... Shakespeare and Wodehouse and Monty Python all wrapped into one! A student gave me this book while we were studying Macbeth in class. Wyrd Sisters is a sort of parallel story, which manages to poke fun at the play, revere the play, make inside jokes about the play, and ... well, generally turn the play on its head. All the while, you, the reader, get to feel very smart and superior for getting all the jokes and allusions. And yet it manages to avoid being gimmicky. It really is a good story with good characters, too. This is no Life of Brian where the story itself matters less than the hilarity of the parody. Wyrd Sisters may draw a good deal of life from Macbeth, but its real liveliness comes from Pratchett's skilled characterizations of a regicidal Duke, his murderess Dutchess, their depressed Fool, and three very colorful witches. Oh, it's just genius. My only problem is figuring out what Pratchett novel to read next ... he's dauntingly prolific!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

    Shakespeare on the Discworld. Truth be told, and all due respect to Rincewind, but I am partial to Sir Terry’s Discworld Witches. Granny Weatherwax returns from Equal Rites to star in another novel, this time in Pratchett’s 1988 entry into the Discworld universe, Wyrd Sisters, his sixth Discworld novel and the second to feature Weatherwax and her sister witches. Nanny Ogg gives her a run for her money though. Pratchett provides Granny Weatherwax with a return visit and introduces two of her sisters, Nanny Ogg and Magrat Garlick as the second and Shakespeare on the Discworld. Truth be told, and all due respect to Rincewind, but I am partial to Sir Terry’s Discworld Witches. Granny Weatherwax returns from Equal Rites to star in another novel, this time in Pratchett’s 1988 entry into the Discworld universe, Wyrd Sisters, his sixth Discworld novel and the second to feature Weatherwax and her sister witches. Nanny Ogg gives her a run for her money though. Pratchett provides Granny Weatherwax with a return visit and introduces two of her sisters, Nanny Ogg and Magrat Garlick as the second and third witches to stand in for the three-witch coven triumvirate (maiden, mother, and crone). We also get to visit with Death (a recurring character in many of the Discworld books) and the Unseen University’s orangutan Librarian. Pratchett pays loving homage to The Bard with clear references to Hamlet, Macbeth, and King Lear and an overall theme of wordsmithing to give Discworld fans a touch of Shakespeare. There is even a character named "Hwel" who does the Discworld services of a traveling playwright. But as in all of the Discworld novels, Sir Terry and his flavorful English humor narration is the real protagonist. Reading this, I smiled frequently and laughed out loud at least a couple times. A very good read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Adrian

    A definite candidate for “book of the month “, review to follow later, football allowing 😬 Well in the end it wasn't the football that delayed me, I was delayed by only my second ever migraine, so apologies if this is a bit of a mushy/nonsensical review as my brain still feels like cotton wool 🤕 Right, lets see, witty, well written, amusing anecdotes, Shakespeare/real life parody, DEATH, witches it has to be Terry Pratchett. I know I read this book many years ago , but I di A definite candidate for “book of the month “, review to follow later, football allowing 😬 Well in the end it wasn't the football that delayed me, I was delayed by only my second ever migraine, so apologies if this is a bit of a mushy/nonsensical review as my brain still feels like cotton wool 🤕 Right, lets see, witty, well written, amusing anecdotes, Shakespeare/real life parody, DEATH, witches it has to be Terry Pratchett. I know I read this book many years ago , but I didn't remember any of it, and in my personal challenge of reading a Discworld novel every month, this has to be my favourite so far (I think I said that last month ha ha). But it was my fave; Granny W, Nanny O and Magrat are all on top form, Granny Weatherwax is at her most imperious and is the epitome of witch "headology". In addition the 3 witches also practice some (for them rare, but) real magic to affect the outcome of a kingdom. Regicide of a tough but fair King sends the kingdom of Lancre into chaos. The rightful heir meanwhile is spirited away whilst a baby to save him with the band of travelling players. Chaos then ensues in the kingdom as the murdering Duke and his wife try to take control of the land. Suffice to say the witches won't allow this and by performing some real magic, the heir to the kingdom is brought back as a (almost) grown man by the wandering thespians. During the madness that follows, a fool falls in love with a witch, the witches end up playing themselves in the performers play, the ghost king tries to stab the Duke who killed him and DEATH is confused by a retractable dagger. All in all a normal day on the Discworld. ( a very disjointed review but that's my head at the moment 😬 )

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    I know the wizards have their fans, but for my money, NOBODY beats the Discworld witches. Granny Weatherwax and her "cronies" try to dethrone an undesirable king in this adventure. To do it they'll need to mess around with time and even consort with...actors - gasp! Here the gals summon a demon, with predictably Pratchett-like results: The waters seethed a little, became very still and then, with a sudden movement and a little popping noise, mounded up into a head. "Well?" it said.Thewith... I know the wizards have their fans, but for my money, NOBODY beats the Discworld witches. Granny Weatherwax and her "cronies" try to dethrone an undesirable king in this adventure. To do it they'll need to mess around with time and even consort with...actors - gasp! Here the gals summon a demon, with predictably Pratchett-like results: The waters seethed a little, became very still and then, with a sudden movement and a little popping noise, mounded up into a head. "Well?" it said. "Who're you?" said Granny, bluntly. The head revolved to face her. "My name is unpronounceable in your tongue, woman," it said. "I'll be the judge of that," warned Granny, and added, "Don't you call me woman." "Very well. My name is WxrtHltl-jwlpklz," said the demon smugly. "Where were you when the vowels were handed out? Behind the door?" said Nanny Ogg. Nanny Ogg is my new role model. A boozy, incorrigible old flirt who uses her cauldron as a beer cooler...what's not to love? She's also an expert when it comes to child rearing: The water under the lid was inky black and, according to rumor, bottomless; the Ogg grandchildren were encouraged to believe that monsters from the dawn of time dwelt in its depths, since Nanny believed that a bit of thrilling and pointless terror was an essential ingredient of the magic of childhood. So, forget about piano lessons and soccer camp. Instead, scare the crap out of your kids. They'll thank you for it!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Wyrd Sisters (Discworld, #6; Witches #2), Terry Pratchett Wyrd Sisters is Terry Pratchett's sixth Discworld novel, published in 1988, and re-introduces Granny Weatherwax of Equal Rites. Wyrd Sisters features three witches: Granny Weatherwax; Nanny Ogg, matriarch of a large tribe of Oggs and owner of the most evil cat in the world; and Magrat Garlick, the junior witch, who firmly believes in occult jewelry, covens, and bubbling cauldrons, much to the annoyance of the other two. King Verence Wyrd Sisters (Discworld, #6; Witches #2), Terry Pratchett Wyrd Sisters is Terry Pratchett's sixth Discworld novel, published in 1988, and re-introduces Granny Weatherwax of Equal Rites. Wyrd Sisters features three witches: Granny Weatherwax; Nanny Ogg, matriarch of a large tribe of Oggs and owner of the most evil cat in the world; and Magrat Garlick, the junior witch, who firmly believes in occult jewelry, covens, and bubbling cauldrons, much to the annoyance of the other two. King Verence I of Lancre is murdered by his cousin, Duke Felmet, after his ambitious wife persuades him to do so. The King's crown and child are given by an escaping servant to the three witches. The witches hand the child to a troupe of travelling actors, and hide the crown in the props-box. They acknowledge that destiny will eventually take its course and that the child, Tomjon, will grow up to defeat Duke Felmet and take his rightful place as king. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و دوم ماه می سال 2016 میلادی عنوان: مجموعه جهان صفحه - کتاب 06 - خواهران سرنوشت؛ نویسنده: تری پرتچت (پراچت)؛ مترجم: محمد حسینی مقدم؛ تهران، ویدا، 1393؛ در 460 ص؛ شابک: 9786002911315؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان انگلیسی - سده ی 20 م جهان صفحه؛ آمیزه ای ست از اسطوره شناسی، و داستانهای فولکلور، با این تفاوت که «پراچت»، روی همه اینها لایه ای از طنز و هزل کشیده، طنزی که باعث شده، منتقدین مجله ی آکسفورد تایمز، ایشان را بامزه ترین نویسنده ی سده ی بیستم میلادی، بنامند، و یا نشریه ی داستانهای علمی تخیلی نیویورک، ایشان را، خنده دار تربن هزل نویس دوره ی اخیر لقب بدهد. در این کتاب که ششمین جلد، از سری «جهان صفحه» است. «پراچت» داستان جادوگرهای سخت کوشی را، بازگو میکند، که علیرغم میل درونی خویش، درگیر جاروجنجالهای دربار میشوند، دوک، و همسر شیطان صفتش، میخواهند: پادشاهی «جهان صفحه» را، غصب کنند، و جادوگرها، باید مانع از اینکار شوند. آیا آنها موفق خواهند شد؟ ا. شربیانی

  6. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte May

    "When you break rules, break 'em good and hard." Hm. I must admit I wasn't as taken with this one as I was with Mort. Terry Pratchett's insatiable wit was still there, but I just wasn't as invested in this story. Three witches - Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg and young Magrat keep to their own little coven and rarely meddle in other affairs. But when three knights appear carrying a baby off into the woods they become suspicious, and decide to get involved. "I reckon responsible behaviour is some "When you break rules, break 'em good and hard." Hm. I must admit I wasn't as taken with this one as I was with Mort. Terry Pratchett's insatiable wit was still there, but I just wasn't as invested in this story. Three witches - Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg and young Magrat keep to their own little coven and rarely meddle in other affairs. But when three knights appear carrying a baby off into the woods they become suspicious, and decide to get involved. "I reckon responsible behaviour is something to get when you grow older. Like varicose veins." Turns out King Verence had been murdered in his own bed by his closest confidante. Leaving behind an unknown heir. So begins a tale full of magic, mummers and general madness. "Only in our dreams are we free. The rest of the time we need wages." I did enjoy it, but it just wasn't as funny as the characters of Death and Mort for me. 3 stars.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    What a funny coincidence that my group started the Discworld buddy-read at a time that meant this 6th installment would be read in October of all months. How utterly appropriate. And I have a confession to make: I think I have a new favourite. O.O So far, my absolute favourite was Mort and it still is fantastic, but this book is at least equally great. There might not be deep messages about mortality, but the plot in Wyrd Sisters has a lot of other important topics to offer. The story is that of how Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg (two old witches f What a funny coincidence that my group started the Discworld buddy-read at a time that meant this 6th installment would be read in October of all months. How utterly appropriate. And I have a confession to make: I think I have a new favourite. O.O So far, my absolute favourite was Mort and it still is fantastic, but this book is at least equally great. There might not be deep messages about mortality, but the plot in Wyrd Sisters has a lot of other important topics to offer. The story is that of how Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg (two old witches from the Discworld) and Magrat (a young witch) have started meeting regularly (the word coven shall not be uttered unless you want to get one of Granny's frowns) and how they come across / save a baby that turns out to be a royal heir. The king of Lancre has just died in an accident been self-defenced to death been assassinated died under certain circumstances that shall not be discussed further so the witches make sure the heir is taken away by a theatre company. However, the land itself is not very happy about the developments so against all supposed rules, the witches need to intervene. There is magic (I vastly prefer the witches' magic to the wizards' one), there is intrigue, there is a bit of swashbuckling, there is almost Shakespearean mummery, there is DEATH, there is an assortment of animals, ghosts - and many plot concepts that get turned on their heads in the most hilarious way. Best of all, on top of getting my beloved Granny Weatherwax, we are also getting her friend Nanny Gytha Ogg (the two are a great pair) AND my beloved Greebo! (If you don't know who Greebo is, just look at the quotes I liked; he's truly unique. :D) There were so many instances here where I didn't only have to chuckle but laugh out loud. Just look at the incredible amount of quotes I highlighted (I had to stop at some point or I would have quoted the entire book). And the entire book was full of fast-paced fun what with the plan the witches come up with to help destiny on its way (though cudos to Terry Pratchett for not making it too easy just because they CAN do magic, that was a nice twist all on its own). Like I said, my new favourite, also helped by another impeccable performance by the narrator who just nails Granny.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    There have been many great reviews on this old favorite of Sir Terry Pratchett's Discworld, and I won't wax eloquent, (or otherwise), save to mention that it's full of Headology and Shakespeare references, between murdered kings and lost heirs and crowns and a mummer's farce and a showdown between Witches and the King, but even so, it's all fun as hell. I think this is the first novel of the Discworld series that truly comes into its own... or the first one that Pratchett uses as the There have been many great reviews on this old favorite of Sir Terry Pratchett's Discworld, and I won't wax eloquent, (or otherwise), save to mention that it's full of Headology and Shakespeare references, between murdered kings and lost heirs and crowns and a mummer's farce and a showdown between Witches and the King, but even so, it's all fun as hell. I think this is the first novel of the Discworld series that truly comes into its own... or the first one that Pratchett uses as the template for all the ones to come. Since this is a second read of the whole series, I found this one to be an awfully familiar and warming experience. I still think that there are better Discworld novels out there, but not by very much. :) All in all, it's a fun read. I can't quite tell whether I like Ogg or Weatherwax more. :) I never really connected with Magrat.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joey Woolfardis

    [First Read: 7th March, 2013. 3 stars. Second Read: 5th October, 2018. 3 stars.] Wyrd Sisters is the second of the Witch mini-series, in the ever popular Discworld series. Equal Rites was the first and we were introduced to one of the greatest characters of all-time: Granny Weatherwax. Wyrd Sisters brings two more witches-and mentions of many others-in to fray: Nanny Ogg, Granny's best friend, and Magrat Garlick, a new-wave witch who thinks jangling jewellery and occult symbols makes you a better wi/>Wyrd/>Wyrd [First Read: 7th March, 2013. 3 stars. Second Read: 5th October, 2018. 3 stars.] Wyrd Sisters is the second of the Witch mini-series, in the ever popular Discworld series. Equal Rites was the first and we were introduced to one of the greatest characters of all-time: Granny Weatherwax. Wyrd Sisters brings two more witches-and mentions of many others-in to fray: Nanny Ogg, Granny's best friend, and Magrat Garlick, a new-wave witch who thinks jangling jewellery and occult symbols makes you a better witch. Adding two new witches alongside Granny just emphasises how cantankerous, stubborn and bloody brilliant she is. Even they can't deny that she's the best. She is tolerated most of the time, but there's always an underlying current of total respect, in the same way you respect your grandparents because they lived through the war, even if they do still say "does anyone want to get a Chinky?" The plot is Shakespearean-Macbeth in particular-and takes many plot points from that, as well as a lot of the quotes. It's a wonderful juxtaposition of Discworld nonsense and Shakespearean tragedy that is twisted with unique Pratchett humour. It is written much the same way all the early Discworld books were. Very well, hardly any technical faults and smatterings of Pratchett humour. Despite the wonderful Granny, the amusing Nanny and the Straightforward but naive Magrat, and my love for all the Discworld witches, I couldn't enjoy this as much as I wanted. It was funny in a tittering kind of way, and the plot was interesting, but it never quite held my attention. I never felt like I wanted to read it all the time, or try and finish reading it. It took me quite a while to get through it (for other reasons I won't go in to) but it never really held me enough to want it. Still a better love story than Twilight.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    So much fun.

  11. 5 out of 5

    BrokenTune

    As the cauldron bubbled an eldritch voice shrieked: ‘When shall we three meet again?’ There was a pause. Finally another voice said, in far more ordinary tones: ‘Well, I can do next Tuesday.’ I just realised that I never finished writing a review for this one even though I absolutely loved it. Wyrd Sisters is the second installment of the Witches sub-series, and is Pratchett's version of what would happen if Hamlet and Macbeth had been set in the Discworld universe - which may just give you an id As the cauldron bubbled an eldritch voice shrieked: ‘When shall we three meet again?’ There was a pause. Finally another voice said, in far more ordinary tones: ‘Well, I can do next Tuesday.’ I just realised that I never finished writing a review for this one even though I absolutely loved it. Wyrd Sisters is the second installment of the Witches sub-series, and is Pratchett's version of what would happen if Hamlet and Macbeth had been set in the Discworld universe - which may just give you an idea of the plot, but will not spoil anything because this is a Discworld novel and anything is possible. Instead of writing a proper review, which I really can't get together because there are too many aspects of awesomeness about this book, I'm going to present a few of my favourite quotes (in no particular order): ‘And until then I have to haunt this place.’ King Verence stared around at the draughty battlements. ‘All alone, I suppose. Won’t anyone be able to see me?’ OH, THE PSYCHICALLY INCLINED. CLOSE RELATIVES. AND CATS, OF COURSE. ‘I hate cats.’ Death’s face became a little stiffer, if that were possible. The blue glow in his eye sockets flickered red for an instant. I SEE, he said. The tone suggested that death was too good for cat-haters. *********************** Lightning stabbed at the earth erratically, like an inefficient assassin. *********************** However, in Bad Ass a cockerel laid an egg and had to put up with some very embarrassing personal questions. *********************** The duke had a mind that ticked like a clock and, like a clock, it regularly went cuckoo. *********************** Demons were like genies or philosophy professors – if you didn’t word things exactly right, they delighted in giving you absolutely accurate and completely misleading answers. *********************** ‘The door’s locked,’ said the Fool. ‘There’s all sorts of noises, but the door’s locked.’ ‘Well, it’s a dungeon, isn’t it?’ ‘They’re not supposed to lock from the inside!’ *********************** It was destined to be the most impressive kiss in the history of foreplay. *********************** ‘Ah,’ said Nanny. She took the girl’s arm. ‘The thing is,’ she explained, ‘as you progress in the Craft, you’ll learn there is another rule. Esme’s obeyed it all her life.’ ‘And what’s that?’ ‘When you break rules, break ‘em good and hard,’ said Nanny, and grinned a set of gums that were more menacing than teeth.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Luffy

    The late Terry Pratchett was a hell of a writer. I thought one of my other favorite Fantasy authors, Brandon Sanderson, was barking up the wrong tree when he lauded Pratchett as a genius. But, I realize now better not to distrust those in the know. It is clear to me that the author of Wyrd Sisters is a master of literature, with this book to prove it. A very great first half leading to a less than perfect second half makes me look forward to the Discworld books. It's queer how the first half em The late Terry Pratchett was a hell of a writer. I thought one of my other favorite Fantasy authors, Brandon Sanderson, was barking up the wrong tree when he lauded Pratchett as a genius. But, I realize now better not to distrust those in the know. It is clear to me that the author of Wyrd Sisters is a master of literature, with this book to prove it. A very great first half leading to a less than perfect second half makes me look forward to the Discworld books. It's queer how the first half emitted shades of Macbeth, while the parts with actual quotes from the play were less heads on. Comes from not reading Shakespeare. Anyway, my expectations were ridiculously exceeded. I hope to choose the next Discworld novella with the same scientific and dutiful approach the kingdom of Lance adopts in choosing their king. Any one will do.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Veronique

    “It is true that words have power, and one of the things they are able to do is get out of someone’s mouth before the speaker has the chance to stop them.” Granny Weatherwax is back! Our favourite witch is brought to the scene when a baby is dropped at her feet leading her and her covent sisters, Nanny Ogg and Magrat Garlick, to deal with the death of a monarch and his rightful succession. All this of course involves a lot more than was first thought, with the kingdom in disarray due to the ‘usu “It is true that words have power, and one of the things they are able to do is get out of someone’s mouth before the speaker has the chance to stop them.” Granny Weatherwax is back! Our favourite witch is brought to the scene when a baby is dropped at her feet leading her and her covent sisters, Nanny Ogg and Magrat Garlick, to deal with the death of a monarch and his rightful succession. All this of course involves a lot more than was first thought, with the kingdom in disarray due to the ‘usurpers’, and forces them to meddle with royal politics. Wyrd Sisters is Pratchett’s homage to the Theatre and Shakespeare, sprinkling references to MacBeth, Hamlet and King Lear all over the plot. As always, the author’s recognisable writing style and humour jump at you, full of metaphors, puns and irony, and threatening all the time to take over :O)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lorenzio Phillibuster Fireworks

    After reading three rather lackluster books in a row I was feeling rather down about the world of reading. Then I read the first sentence of Wyrd Sisters. I entered the world of witches, Shakespearean plots and a novel full of Terry Pratchett's wonderful, quirky sense of humour. As the cauldron bubbled an eldritch voice shrieked: 'When shall we three meet again?' There was a pause. Finally another voice said, in a far more ordinary tones: 'Well, I can do next Tuesday.' pg 1. I think my fa After reading three rather lackluster books in a row I was feeling rather down about the world of reading. Then I read the first sentence of Wyrd Sisters. I entered the world of witches, Shakespearean plots and a novel full of Terry Pratchett's wonderful, quirky sense of humour. As the cauldron bubbled an eldritch voice shrieked: 'When shall we three meet again?' There was a pause. Finally another voice said, in a far more ordinary tones: 'Well, I can do next Tuesday.' pg 1. I think my favourite part of this book had to be the Shakespeare references, especially the Mabeth reference of the usurping King and Queen. I could not refrain from cringing everytime the new King washed, sandpapered and filed his hand away to remove the blood of the former King. I loved the play occuring at the end of the book which reenacted the entire plot of the novel with plenty of references to Shakespeare plays like The Tempest. THis was probably my favourite overall plot of the Discworld series so far, but it is always Pratchett's humour that shines. This book has over 30 post its in it of my favourite quotes or descriptions and I wish I could include them all. Apart from the main plot of royal politics and witch involvement there is the FANTASTIC explanation of Ankh Morporks legal system in which thieves are given licenses and, through a complex system, it is arranged that a) the members could make a reasonable living and b) no citizen was robbed or assaulted more than an agreed number of times and all receipts were handed out. Many forsighted citizens in fact arranged to get an acceptable minimum of theft, assault, etc, over at the beginning of the financial year, often in the privacy and comfort of their own homes, and thus be able to walk the streets quite safely for the rest of the year. pg 227. One of my favourite descriptions in the book was of the life of a storm. The storm was really giving it everything it had. This was its big chance. It had spent years hanging around the provinces, putting in some useful work as a squall, building up experience, making contacts, occasionally leaping out on unsuspecting shepherds or blasting quite small oak trees. Now an opening in the weather had given it an opportunity to strut its hour, and it was building up its role in the hope of being spotted by one of the big climates. It was a good storm. There was quite effective projection and passion there, and critics agreed that if it would only learn to control its thunderit would be, in years to come, a storm to watch. pg 6-7. Terry Pratchett also continues to show his affinity for cats: 'I hate cats.' Death's face became a little stiffer, if that were possible. The blue glow in his eye sockets flickered red for an instant. I SEE, he said. The tone suggested that death was too good for cat haters. ...a key to the understanding of all religion is that a god's idea of amusement is Snakes and Ladders with greased rungs. The calender of the Theocracy of Muntab counts down not up. No one knows why, but it might not be a good idea to hang around and find out. I think that since the play is commencing to start, your friends must find a seat elsewhere, when they arrive,' he said, and sat down. Within seconds his face went white. His teeth began to chatter. He clutched his stomach and groaned. * * The observant will realise that this was because the king was already seated there. It was not because the man had used the phrase 'commence to start' in cold blood. But it ought to have been. I'd like to know if I could compare you to a summer's day. Because - well, June 12th was quite nice, and...Oh. You've gone...

  15. 5 out of 5

    Vicky N.

    Rating: 4.5 stars Wyrd Sisters is the sixth book in the Discworld series, a series known for it's many books and trickiness into deciding its reading order. I found Wyrd Sisters a perfectly good introduction into the world. It is a fun and light hearted book involving witches, kings and magic. It is a parody of the genre and it is gloriously entertaining and such a soothing change of pace from your typical fantasy novel. Nobody takes themselves seriously in this book. T Rating: 4.5 stars Wyrd Sisters is the sixth book in the Discworld series, a series known for it's many books and trickiness into deciding its reading order. I found Wyrd Sisters a perfectly good introduction into the world. It is a fun and light hearted book involving witches, kings and magic. It is a parody of the genre and it is gloriously entertaining and such a soothing change of pace from your typical fantasy novel. Nobody takes themselves seriously in this book. The witches know what you expect witches to be like and they fill your expectations and then throw them to the ground. I loved Magrat, the youngest witch and new one to the job. She is constantly been berated by her eldest and they find her ideas of witch-hood strange, just like she finds the two old witches outdated. Loved their interactions, and the contrast between characters. I also really liked how they started detached and slowly became a coven and just learned to get along. I also loved Granny's grumpiness and Nanny Ogg with her vast family. It's also very shakespeare-influenced, but it played with the influence and his knowledge that you would get the references. A true joy to read and a fantastic start to a brilliant series that I can't wait to continue.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Susanna - Censored by GoodReads

    Hamlet and MacBeth had a baby, and it was a comedy. 3.5 stars.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ivan

    I am warming up to Witches but so far City Watch is still my favorite Discworld series.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    3.5 stars This is the second book with Granny Weatherwax, though it’s not necessary to read the first. She has two witch friends. Meanwhile there are ghosts, regicide, a traveling troupe of actors, and a very awkward romance involving one of the witches. There’s a strong plot here compared to much of Discworld. Overall it’s a parody of Shakespeare, particularly Macbeth and Hamlet. The humor is heavy on puns. It’s a fine addition to the Discworld collection and a fun book th 3.5 stars This is the second book with Granny Weatherwax, though it’s not necessary to read the first. She has two witch friends. Meanwhile there are ghosts, regicide, a traveling troupe of actors, and a very awkward romance involving one of the witches. There’s a strong plot here compared to much of Discworld. Overall it’s a parody of Shakespeare, particularly Macbeth and Hamlet. The humor is heavy on puns. It’s a fine addition to the Discworld collection and a fun book that meets all expectations. (My edition has some glaring typos in it.)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Obsidian

    I really don't enjoy reading books out of order, but since this was our buddy read for Halloween bingo, I didn't have a choice this time. The Color of Magic is sitting on my bookshelves and I hope I will be able to read it for the next 16 Festive Tasks. Or just whenever this year. If you want to read a non-scary book about witches, this one is for you. I cracked up a lot reading about witches in this world (Discworld) and how three witches get involved after a king (King Verence I of Lancre) is I really don't enjoy reading books out of order, but since this was our buddy read for Halloween bingo, I didn't have a choice this time. The Color of Magic is sitting on my bookshelves and I hope I will be able to read it for the next 16 Festive Tasks. Or just whenever this year. If you want to read a non-scary book about witches, this one is for you. I cracked up a lot reading about witches in this world (Discworld) and how three witches get involved after a king (King Verence I of Lancre) is murdered (as one does). I probably missed some in jokes on the Discworld series since I started with book #6 and not #1, but I am sure some people will point that out to me. When the King Verence I of Lancre is murdered by his cousin, Duke Felmet, one of his servants hides his child away and the child is given to three witches. The three witches are: Granny Weatherwax; Nanny Ogg, and Magrat Garlick, so Pratchett sets up right away the three archetypes of the maiden, the mother, and the crone. Granny doesn't want to meddle with Duke Felmet though Nanny and Magrat do want to not only keep the baby, but meddle with Felmet. Two of the witches, Nanny and Granny have some backstory going on and it is hilarious to see them going at each other. You will also love hearing about one witch (apparently just the one) who was responsible for Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, and came to her doom due to some kids putting her in her own oven. The Duke is just shiftless and the witches know that things will get worse with him ruling so they realize that they may need to do what they can to make sure the king's son lives and rules. The Duke's wife is pretty horrible and I did love how Pratchett wrapped up her story. We also have someone just called The Fool who plays an important part in this story. I also loved the writing. There were some hilarious bits in this book. Though I was less enamored with the inclusion of play type writing. We had Pratchett in several places linking things up to Shakespeare's three witches in Macbeth. I do get why he did it since the Wyrd Sisters we have here are a play on the ones from that play and the way Pratchett has the Duke ordering a play to be made about the terrible witches in order to look better. I just had a hard time switching writing styles back and forth. I also had an issue with the footnotes in the Kindle version I got. I tried clicking on them and sometimes they took me to where they note was, but had a hard time getting back to where I was at prior to clicking the footnote. Loved the world building with these three witches meddling to do what is necessary to save the kingdom. The ending was hilarious to me. No spoilers, but you pretty much get some funny reveals about the new King and I cracked up.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Executive Summary: Started slow, but the second half kind of made up for the first half. And very quotable as always. 3.5 Stars. Full Review Well I made it! I did 5 Discworld books in the last few months. I was able to read this book in April for Sword and Laser without having to skip any books. It's not my favorite of the bunch, but I definitely enjoyed it more than I did Sourcery. I think I might have enjoyed Equal Rites more though. I was warned that Granny Weatherwax was a bit different in this one/> Executive Summary: Started slow, but the second half kind of made up for the first half. And very quotable as always. 3.5 Stars. Full Review Well I made it! I did 5 Discworld books in the last few months. I was able to read this book in April for Sword and Laser without having to skip any books. It's not my favorite of the bunch, but I definitely enjoyed it more than I did Sourcery. I think I might have enjoyed Equal Rites more though. I was warned that Granny Weatherwax was a bit different in this one. I honestly found her more likable in that book, and that the overall story was better. That said, this book was still a lot of fun, especially the second half. My favorite parts involved Tomjon and Hwel and the play. But the witches were pretty good too. Their banter was usually pretty amusing. Nanny Ogg was a great addition. I look forward to seeing more of her in the future. It's been awhile since I've read Macbeth, so I'm sure I missed a lot of the references and in jokes, but I got enough of them to get a pretty good laugh. Overall another good, but not great entry in the Discworld books. Time for a bit of a break. I plan to come back to the series later on this year though.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jan-Maat

    I found this fun in parts but also slightly awkward, maybe the Shakespeare references got a bit too heavy handed for me? It's great reading a few of these books and keeping track of Nanny Ogg's declining number of teeth, and on the whole I think the witches were the funniest part as they try to provide orientation to a new witch. The ideas are good fun, like the leakage of Shakespeare from our universe in to unsuspecting discworld, or more precisely the theatrical dwarf suffering from the effect I found this fun in parts but also slightly awkward, maybe the Shakespeare references got a bit too heavy handed for me? It's great reading a few of these books and keeping track of Nanny Ogg's declining number of teeth, and on the whole I think the witches were the funniest part as they try to provide orientation to a new witch. The ideas are good fun, like the leakage of Shakespeare from our universe in to unsuspecting discworld, or more precisely the theatrical dwarf suffering from the effects of getting all the inspiration, or how the traditional fairy tale three blessings wind up, entirely reasonably, creating a great actor rather than a great king. But in the end they tend I felt towards being big shaggy dog stories with lolling tongues leading to a single small joke.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cora Tea Party Princess

    I love this trio of witches. Terry Pratchett has done it again - another fantastic tale of the Discworld. The plot is hilarious and the characters even more so. But still there's a thread of romance, a sweet little side story. This story has heart.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    This might be my favorite Discworld so far!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    If the idiots of the world aren't careful, they'll find themselves being educated without knowing it. Reading Pratchett is like reading something written by someone who finds pretty much everything interesting, and wants to share it with you without condescending or being preachy. Oh, wait... Here he tackles Macbeth in particular, and the power of the written and spoken word in general. How he manages to take something as epic and classic as Macbeth and simultaneously mock it and pay homage If the idiots of the world aren't careful, they'll find themselves being educated without knowing it. Reading Pratchett is like reading something written by someone who finds pretty much everything interesting, and wants to share it with you without condescending or being preachy. Oh, wait... Here he tackles Macbeth in particular, and the power of the written and spoken word in general. How he manages to take something as epic and classic as Macbeth and simultaneously mock it and pay homage to it is probably the essence of what makes Pratchett a truly great author. His characters are no-nonsense, rational people often thrown into ridiculous situations that cause havoc and general hilarity. You can literally see him having fun with the story, playing with conventions in every possible way and still creating a gloriously readable, constantly chuckle-causing tale. The three witches are works of genius, genuinely likeable, funny, and quirky characters whose interactions are a joy to behold. You would think that a man's view of women written 25 years ago would date horribly and laughably, but it's a mark of how insightful and observant Pratchett was that they are just as warm, relevant and funny now as they ever have been. There's pretty much nothing wrong with this book; it's entertainment in its purest form, handled by a master.

  25. 5 out of 5

    WhiskeyintheJar/Kyraryker

    3.5 stars I read this for the Free Space for Halloween Bingo She gave the guards a nod as she went through. It didn’t occur to either of them to stop her because witches, like beekeepers and big gorillas, went where they liked. Part of the Discworld but also the Witches series, Granny, Nanny, and Magrat run and steal the show. I would describe this as kind of a Monty Python take on Macbeth and Hamlet (with a little bit of King Lear, Sleeping Beauty, Hansel and Gretel, and probably splashe/> 3.5 stars I read this for the Free Space for Halloween Bingo She gave the guards a nod as she went through. It didn’t occur to either of them to stop her because witches, like beekeepers and big gorillas, went where they liked. Part of the Discworld but also the Witches series, Granny, Nanny, and Magrat run and steal the show. I would describe this as kind of a Monty Python take on Macbeth and Hamlet (with a little bit of King Lear, Sleeping Beauty, Hansel and Gretel, and probably splashes of more I missed). If you're a reader of the Discworld, you'll be ready for the little bit chaotic, humor, brick wall bleakness, and underlining too true takes on humanity. A kingdom is made up of all sorts of things. Ideas. Loyalties. Memories. It all sort of exists together. And then all these things create some kind of life. Not a body kind of life, more like a living idea. Made up of everything that’s alive and what they’re thinking. And what the people before them thought.” We start off with the murder of a King, who becomes a ghost, our three witches taking a baby from soldiers, the new mad King and his reveling in her evilness wife, and a wise fool. Even though the witches normally try to stay out of things, Granny decides that she needs to set things to rights and have the true heir on the throne. I enjoyed the first half, which was more Macbeth, than the magically fast forward 15 years Hamlet like second. The duke smiled out over the forest. “It works,” he said. “The people mutter against the witches. How do you do it, Fool?” “Jokes, nuncle. And gossip. People are halfway ready to believe it anyway. Everyone respects the witches. The point is that no one actually likes them very much.” Shining through and underlining all these seemingly chaotic going-ons, are some excellent hot takes on propaganda and how history is recorded, by who, why they are writing events and figures the way they are, and how this influences and shapes future attitudes. This is an aspect of history that I don't think is talked about enough, questioning the motives behind historical recorders. “But I’m his Fool,” said the Fool. “A Fool has to be loyal to his master. Right up until he dies. I’m afraid it’s tradition. Tradition is very important.” “But you don’t even like being a Fool!” “I hate it. But that’s got nothing to do with it. If I’ve got to be a Fool, I’ll do it properly.” “That’s really stupid,”said Magrat. “Foolish, I’d prefer.” Granny is the immediate stand-out in this but the Fool is the dark horse. In all this spoofing, he has some of the most thought provoking quotes; they bordered on dystopian at times. I couldn't help reading this through a current political climate lens and it hurt at times reading the scenes with the Fool, the new King, and his wife. Even when we get the second part of the witches work to change things, it doesn't end up quite to their preference but maybe for the best? This would be a great book club selection as I highlighted the heck out of this and could have endless discussions about it. I've mentioned before how humor is a tough one for me, so that hurt my overall enjoyment along with the frenetic/chaotic tone pushing against my more structured self. Many friends have said this is one of their favorites from the disc world and I can see why, the three witches will delight you, I felt the second half let them down a bit. Even though things may not have worked out exactly like Granny wanted, I leave you with some inspiration from her, Granny Weatherwax was often angry. She considered it one of her strong points. Genuine anger was one of the world’s great creative forces. But you had to learn how to control it. That didn’t mean you let it trickle away. It meant you dammed it, carefully, let it develop a working head, let it drown whole valleys of the mind and then, just when the whole structure was about to collapse, opened a tiny pipeline at the base and let the iron-hard stream of wrath power the turbines of revenge.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Toby

    Pure entertainment from start to finish. Nanny Ogg is so similar to my own grandmother that I am drawn to her character first before the more famous Granny Wetherwax despite this being the grand dame of headology's first appearance as we would come to know her after the character exploration of Equal Rites. Taking two months away from reading and reviewing has really taken its toll, I can barely think of a thing to say. It doesn't matter though, this one has stood the test of time and in posteri Pure entertainment from start to finish. Nanny Ogg is so similar to my own grandmother that I am drawn to her character first before the more famous Granny Wetherwax despite this being the grand dame of headology's first appearance as we would come to know her after the character exploration of Equal Rites. Taking two months away from reading and reviewing has really taken its toll, I can barely think of a thing to say. It doesn't matter though, this one has stood the test of time and in posterity stands on its own as a shining light in the Discworld cannon.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Karen ⊰✿

    This is the second book in the Witches sub-series of Discworld. Here we are introduced to three witches who decided it may be a good idea to start a coven - Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg and Magrat. They don't really know why a coven is necessary, but it seemed like a good idea at the time. When the king is murdered (which according to the witches is just an occupational hazard), they reluctantly get caught up in town matters and politics ; and there is even a spot of romance for young Magrat.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Chaikin

    2008 -- that's the last time I finished a novel by this once favorite author of mine. The brain shifted and the books lost their appeal enough that a little difficulty threw me off. This is, mind you, a tough book to punch through in some ways. It's always smart and clever, but it lacks narrative drive and just kind of hangs around for well over a hundred pages before it finally pulls itself together. So, maybe in 2008, I gave up on this 60 pages in. This time I actually read Shakespeare's Macbe 2008 -- that's the last time I finished a novel by this once favorite author of mine. The brain shifted and the books lost their appeal enough that a little difficulty threw me off. This is, mind you, a tough book to punch through in some ways. It's always smart and clever, but it lacks narrative drive and just kind of hangs around for well over a hundred pages before it finally pulls itself together. So, maybe in 2008, I gave up on this 60 pages in. This time I actually read Shakespeare's Macbeth to prep for the humor here made of it. The book does come together though. At some point the scene shifts, or maybe it was the orangutan librarian swinging life back in, but that charm I remember, unique to Discworld, did kick in. I'm kind of ready to read another. ----------------------------------------------- 67. Wyrd Sisters by Terry Pratchett published: 1988 format: 265 page mass market Paperback (a 2001 edition, and 13th printing by HarperCollins under HarperTorch imprint) acquired: 2007 read: Dec 18-30 (I tried once before, in maybe 2008) time reading: 10 hr 0 min, 2.3 min/page rating: 3

  29. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    The first in the series to really frustrate me. Maybe I wasn’t in the right mind to read this book, maybe Pratchett’s style has evolved beyond what I enjoy. I understand this is one of the more well regarded Discworld novels, but I struggled to even pick it up. I appreciated the nods to Shakespeare, and some of the moments between Hwel and Tomjon were enjoyable, but I mostly disliked this. Here’s hoping Guards Guards is a better read... I’ll be taking a break from Discworld for awhile.

  30. 4 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    Pratchett takes a jab at Shakespeare's classics 31 October 2012 Well, here I am writing a commentary on Wyrd Sisters on Halloween. Okay, this book isn't about Halloween, but the three main characters are witches, and there are a lot of ghosts in this book as well, so it seems that it is quite ironic that I am writing about it now. Not that I particularly subscribe to Halloween though, since it is an American holiday, though that is a bit of a technicality since it is really only in America Pratchett takes a jab at Shakespeare's classics 31 October 2012 Well, here I am writing a commentary on Wyrd Sisters on Halloween. Okay, this book isn't about Halloween, but the three main characters are witches, and there are a lot of ghosts in this book as well, so it seems that it is quite ironic that I am writing about it now. Not that I particularly subscribe to Halloween though, since it is an American holiday, though that is a bit of a technicality since it is really only in America that its modern form has taken shape (and unfortunately it is being exported here to Australia). Everybody likes that phrase 'only in America' since there is a belief that everything weird and strange comes from America. Mind you, in the 1st century AD, Tacitus wrote that everything weird and strange ends up in Rome. Anyway, Halloween is not traditionally an America holiday, but rather Catholic holiday that has been celebrated in Europe for centuries, though not in the form that it is celebrated now. Halloween was originally All Hallow's Eve, the night before All Saint's Day. The idea (I believe, and I am not an expert, and I'm not going to look it up on Wikipedia because I can't be bothered) is that it is the night when all of the bad and nasty things of the spirit world are let loose before the saints come along and deal with them. Mind you, All Saint's Day is hardly the holiest day of the Christian Calendar, but it is still up there. Okay, enough of Halloween and let us consider Wyrd Sisters. This play is sort of a cross between Macbeth and Hamlet, Terry Pratchett style. The Hamlet aspect involve the ghosts and the players, while the Macbeth aspect deals with the usurption of the throne by an envious duke who is egged on by his ambitious wife. Okay, Hamlet also involved somebody usurping the throne, but he was not egged on by his wife. The bloody hands that play such a significant role in Macbeth is brought out here by Pratchett in much the same way, though the odd thing is that he tells us numerous times throughout the book that it is quite natural for a king to be usurped. However, this case is different, and in a way it has something to do with the king not wanting to be king. The idea of power plays out a lot in this book. The usurption in a way is about power, but in a way it is not. Even though he is king, he isn't really king of all that much. Basically a small kingdom that is little more than a bunch of mountains that produce very little. There is also the idea that he hates the kingdom. Okay, we are told that kings generally are not nice people, however this king goes overboard in that he hates the kingdom, and it shows. However the only people that could do anything about it can't, and won't: the witches. The witches in Pratchett are quite interesting characters. As we learned from Equal Rites, witches use a power called headology. All of the witches power comes from people believing that they are powerful, and because of this belief they treat them as powerful. When the king attempts to tax them, and the guards go to collect the taxes, the guards are already on edge, and the witches simply have to make a couple of moves and the guards flee in panic. However, in this book there is a battle of wits. The witches only have power because people believe they have power, and as soon as somebody stands up to them, and does not back away, that power is broken. The theatre plays a significant role in this book (I keep on wanting to call it a play) and it is interesting that Pratchett generally tells us everything he wants to portray. There is really none of this analogy of guessing that we have in other books. If he wants us to see that theatre is a mirror that is held up to reality, he tells us that that is what it is. There is also the idea of destiny, and as he says, destiny has this annoying habit of sending you in a direction you do not want to go. There is a dwarf who becomes a playwright but while he is a dwarf, he does not act like a dwarf. There is an heir to a throne who does not want to be an heir to a throne, and his ability to be an heir is only as good as his acting ability allows. There is also the fool who doesn't want to be a fool and is only a fool because he was told to be a fool. Now, the fool is a very important character, and this is something that is also very Shakespearian. In fact, this book is a parody of everything Shakespeare. In Shakespeare, the fool takes the role of the person who can tell a king what his problem is without having to worry about having his head removed from his body. However, this fool is vastly different. In fact he is the antithesis of the Shakespearian fool in that he cannot tell the king the truth, because if he does, he is in trouble, so he spends the entire book telling the king the opposite of the truth, namely that he wasn't at the top of the stairs, and he did not stab the previous king with a dagger. This is done to emphasise the king's guilt, something that plays on him through the story. This, once again, is the opposite of Shakespeare. In Macbeth, it is not the usurper who is guilty, but the usurper's wife. Okay, Macbeth is incredibly paranoid, but the blood is on the wife's hands ('out, out, damn spot'). Here the wife is guilt free, and it is the king who is stained by guilt, and the guilt also gives rise to his paranoia, to the point that he must surround himself with a fool, and orchestrate a play to convince himself that the lie is in fact the truth.

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