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Rinkitink In Oz: By L. Frank Baum - Illustrated

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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Rinkitink in Oz: Wherein is Recorded the Perilous Quest of Prince Inga of Pingaree and King Rinkitink How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Rinkitink in Oz: Wherein is Recorded the Perilous Quest of Prince Inga of Pingaree and King Rinkitink in the Magical Isles that Lie Beyond the Borderland of Oz. is the tenth book in the Land of Oz series written by L. Frank Baum. Published on June 20, 1916, with full-color and black-and-white illustrations by artist John R. Neill, it is significant that no one from Oz appears in the book until its climax; this is due to Baum's having originally written most of the book as an original fantasy novel over ten years earlier, in 1905. Most of the action takes place on three islands – Pingaree, Regos, and Coregos – and within the Nome King's caverns. Since the original ruler of the nomes, Roquat – who later renamed himself Ruggedo, was deposed in 1914's Tik-Tok of Oz, Baum had to cleverly rework the tale to accommodate his successor, the well-intentioned – but politically motivated – Kaliko. The book was dedicated to the author's newborn grandson Robert Alison Baum, the first child of the author's second son Robert Stanton Baum.


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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Rinkitink in Oz: Wherein is Recorded the Perilous Quest of Prince Inga of Pingaree and King Rinkitink How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Rinkitink in Oz: Wherein is Recorded the Perilous Quest of Prince Inga of Pingaree and King Rinkitink in the Magical Isles that Lie Beyond the Borderland of Oz. is the tenth book in the Land of Oz series written by L. Frank Baum. Published on June 20, 1916, with full-color and black-and-white illustrations by artist John R. Neill, it is significant that no one from Oz appears in the book until its climax; this is due to Baum's having originally written most of the book as an original fantasy novel over ten years earlier, in 1905. Most of the action takes place on three islands – Pingaree, Regos, and Coregos – and within the Nome King's caverns. Since the original ruler of the nomes, Roquat – who later renamed himself Ruggedo, was deposed in 1914's Tik-Tok of Oz, Baum had to cleverly rework the tale to accommodate his successor, the well-intentioned – but politically motivated – Kaliko. The book was dedicated to the author's newborn grandson Robert Alison Baum, the first child of the author's second son Robert Stanton Baum.

30 review for Rinkitink In Oz: By L. Frank Baum - Illustrated

  1. 5 out of 5

    Evgeny

    Somewhere in an ocean not far from the Land of Oz there is an island called Pingaree populated by peaceful people whose main occupation is to collect pearls. They accumulated quite a bit of wealth by selling them to nearby continental kingdom of Gilgad. One day the King of Gilgad named Rinkitink paid a visit to the islanders. The guy turned out to be quite jolly and fat (think Santa Claus). In fact because of his weight problems most of the time he moved around riding a talking goat Bilbil. The Somewhere in an ocean not far from the Land of Oz there is an island called Pingaree populated by peaceful people whose main occupation is to collect pearls. They accumulated quite a bit of wealth by selling them to nearby continental kingdom of Gilgad. One day the King of Gilgad named Rinkitink paid a visit to the islanders. The guy turned out to be quite jolly and fat (think Santa Claus). In fact because of his weight problems most of the time he moved around riding a talking goat Bilbil. The goat constant grumpiness balanced King's jolliness nicely. The famous modern Grumpy Cat has nothing on Bilbil when it comes to being grumpy: So everything was fun and games until warriors from northern islands came to loot and pillage. Loot and pillage they did. After they left carrying back wealth and prisoners to make slaves all what was left on the island were complete ruins, the prince Inga overlooked by the conquerors, Rinkitink who fell down a well, and Bilbil who looked so old and skinny nobody even thought about slaughtering it for meat. Now it is up to Inga armed with three magic pearls and his accidental followers to rescue his parents and his people. The previous 9 books of the series settled into a comfortable, but repetitive pattern of the following plot. Some people/creatures ended up in an unusual place, they travel around trying to get to a civilized lands, meet unusual creatures and see other unusual places. Finally Ozma or Dorothy take pity of them and bring the travelers to the Land of Oz; the (happy) end. Imagine my surprise when I realized that in tenth book the pattern was finally broken. First thing I noticed was smoother writing style; I really like the description of the island kingdom. The overall tone became much darker than in the previous installments quite fast. Both Bilbil and Rinkitink said some things that the intended audience - young kids - would not understand. This was probably the first time during my reading of the series when I became curious about what would happen next. The suspense held for about three quarters of the book. At the end L. Frank Baum realized he needed to tie the tale to Oz somehow. So in about three chapters before the end he brought Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz in. You can practically hear them kicking and screaming because they really do not belong. So a darker and more complicated tale than usual, interesting characters, but bolted on ending yield 4 stars as a final rating. To be honest it might be closer to 3.5 stars, but I was taken from the blind side by unexpectedly adult themes of the book, so I rounded the rating up.

  2. 5 out of 5

    TJ✨

    This was my least favorite oz book so far review to come (maybe)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    This is my least favourite Oz book so far and part of the reason for that is because it blatantly wasn't intended to be an Oz book. There's no connection to Oz at all until the last couple of chapters when the Nome King is shoehorned in as an additional threat (a somewhat random 'end level boss' for those of you familiar with a certain type of video game) and then Dorothy, the Wizard and Glinda are brought in as an even more random deus ex machina to top things off. It's just clumsy writing. The This is my least favourite Oz book so far and part of the reason for that is because it blatantly wasn't intended to be an Oz book. There's no connection to Oz at all until the last couple of chapters when the Nome King is shoehorned in as an additional threat (a somewhat random 'end level boss' for those of you familiar with a certain type of video game) and then Dorothy, the Wizard and Glinda are brought in as an even more random deus ex machina to top things off. It's just clumsy writing. The other reason I disliked this book is the titular Rinkitink. He is, hands down, the single most annoying character I've ever encountered in a work of fiction. He makes Jar Jar Binks look like Gandalf by comparison. Just two chapters into the book I could have cheerfully shot him in the face. So, in the light of all this, why as many as three stars? Well, despite its downsides, this isn't a bad little adventure story up until the point the Oz elements are introduced. Prince Inga is a bit on the bland side as protagonists go but his intentions are honourable and he deserves a gold medal for putting up with Rinkitink for so long without murdering him in his sleep! Also, the character of Bilbil the depressed, smart-mouthed, talking goat is fantastic. Genuinely hilarious, it's a real shame the character was stuck in such an otherwise lacklustre book. Overall, two-and-a-half stars, rounded up.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nicolas

    By far my favorite Oz book to date. The story and characters are original and don't rely on the standard Oz archetypes. An unlikey group of heroes consisiting of the jolly King Rinkitink, Bilbil the talking goat and young Prince Inga take off to rescue Inga's parents. This takes them to many different lands and ultimately pits them against Kaliko the nome king. My one complaint is the sloppy inclusion of Dorothy & the Wizard. After follwing King Rinkitink and Prince Inga throughout the story By far my favorite Oz book to date. The story and characters are original and don't rely on the standard Oz archetypes. An unlikey group of heroes consisiting of the jolly King Rinkitink, Bilbil the talking goat and young Prince Inga take off to rescue Inga's parents. This takes them to many different lands and ultimately pits them against Kaliko the nome king. My one complaint is the sloppy inclusion of Dorothy & the Wizard. After follwing King Rinkitink and Prince Inga throughout the story I felt a little robbed to have Dorothy show up in time to save the day. I would have preferred to see Inga & Rinkitink outsmart the nome king rather than having the victory belong to Dorothy. I understand needing to bring the Land of Oz into the story, but that could have been done by simply having the travelers end up in Oz or even having Dorothy simply help Inga while still allowing him to be the hero of the book. He could have taken Kaliko with the help of Bilbil & Rinkitink. Overall this was a very good book and makes me want to read some of Baum's non-Oz fiction.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tarissa

    Another fun adventure fairy tale from L. Frank Baum. I even love the grumpy character of Bilbil the goat. He's so disgruntled, it's comical! However, I liked it best when Dorothy Gale finally entered the story -- I do miss her when she's not there. Sometimes, I feel like the Oz stories may not be super interesting to youngsters nowadays, because it's just written in a older, different style. But then again, there are some laugh-out-loud moments, where the author has some real wit.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dianna

    One of the best Oz books I've read yet! I read in the afterword that Baum actually intended this as a non-Oz book originally (no surprise, since the Oz part at the end seemed an afterthought and somewhat contrived). It tells the story of Prince Inga, who rescues his parents and the people of his island nation with the help of three magic pearls. King Rinkitink is a funny character; I love his laugh. I'm glad Baum decided to re-purpose this book into his Oz series—I'm sure many more people read i One of the best Oz books I've read yet! I read in the afterword that Baum actually intended this as a non-Oz book originally (no surprise, since the Oz part at the end seemed an afterthought and somewhat contrived). It tells the story of Prince Inga, who rescues his parents and the people of his island nation with the help of three magic pearls. King Rinkitink is a funny character; I love his laugh. I'm glad Baum decided to re-purpose this book into his Oz series—I'm sure many more people read it as a result.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Hunter

    Hands down, Baum’s best effort since early in the Oz series. Nary a mention of the yellow brick road; minimal bludgeoning of readers with introductions of meaningless but interesting new characters. Surprise of surprises, Baum tells a story located primarily in only three small island places - Pingaree, Regos, and Coregos. Heck, Oz characters and places don’t make an appearance until the very end! Turns out Baum took a fantasy novel he’d written ten years earlier and Ozified it. He should bring Hands down, Baum’s best effort since early in the Oz series. Nary a mention of the yellow brick road; minimal bludgeoning of readers with introductions of meaningless but interesting new characters. Surprise of surprises, Baum tells a story located primarily in only three small island places - Pingaree, Regos, and Coregos. Heck, Oz characters and places don’t make an appearance until the very end! Turns out Baum took a fantasy novel he’d written ten years earlier and Ozified it. He should bring outside influences into his Ozian universe more often.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    First, my dislikes about the book: snother misleading title, and another deus ex machina ending - but at least Baum is consistent. Rinkitink is an important character, and he does eventually wind up in Oz, but Prince Inga is the main protagonist who drives the plot and actually develops as a character. And I don't want to put any spoilers here, but if you've read any other Oz books, then you know that last-minute convenient saves by Glinda or Ozma are Baum's usual way of wrapping up a story. Asid First, my dislikes about the book: snother misleading title, and another deus ex machina ending - but at least Baum is consistent. Rinkitink is an important character, and he does eventually wind up in Oz, but Prince Inga is the main protagonist who drives the plot and actually develops as a character. And I don't want to put any spoilers here, but if you've read any other Oz books, then you know that last-minute convenient saves by Glinda or Ozma are Baum's usual way of wrapping up a story. Aside from those two issues (which, after reading so many Oz books, I think are just Baum's writing quirks), I loved this book. The story was different enough from other Oz stories to be refreshing, but still had all of the winsome fairytale charm that makes the Oz books so lovely. Also, there was a definite antagonist, giving Prince Inga a goal to strive for right from the get-go; this was a nice change from many of the Oz books which are basically a plot-less road-trip through Ozian oddities. I would recommend this book to any lover of the Oz stories, and also to anyone who wants a good fairy tale story. Because most of the established characters like Dorothy, the Wizard, and Ozma don't show up till the very end, this book can easily be enjoyed by someone with no previous knowledge of any of Baum's other books.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    This is one of my favorites of the original Oz books. I love the idea of the Three Pearls and the characters of Prince Inga, Zella, Nikobob, King Rinkitink, and Bilbil the goat, as well as the depiction of Kaliko as the Nome King. There's actually some real dramatic tension during Prince Inga's multiple attempts to rescue his parents and their people from Regos and Coregos and especially when Prince Inga and Rinkitink are separated and challenged by the Nome King's magic! I'm less enamored of Do This is one of my favorites of the original Oz books. I love the idea of the Three Pearls and the characters of Prince Inga, Zella, Nikobob, King Rinkitink, and Bilbil the goat, as well as the depiction of Kaliko as the Nome King. There's actually some real dramatic tension during Prince Inga's multiple attempts to rescue his parents and their people from Regos and Coregos and especially when Prince Inga and Rinkitink are separated and challenged by the Nome King's magic! I'm less enamored of Dorothy and the Wizard as the deus ex machina that swoop in at the end to make everything right with a basket of eggs and a well-placed foot-stamp or two, and the obligatory banquet in the second to last chapter where every personage of any standing in Oz makes an appearance. The title is a bit disingenuous since Oz doesn't even come up until chapter 20 of 24, and I'm not sure why Rinkitink gets top billing over Prince Inga. But Oz was what was selling, so I'm sure that's why Mr. Baum threw them in at the end and Rinkitink is just a lot of fun to say! For more book reviews, come visit my blog, Build Enough Bookshelves.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kathrin

    At this point my determination to finish the series is far greater than the joy I take from reading the books. This would actually be a good reason to stop reading them but I really want to see if there's still a great book left in the series. I was especially disappointed by this book as it had hardly anything to do with Oz and the title is confusing as well. I guess I would much rather read something new about Oz than just having a random story about another place. Nevertheless, some of the ch At this point my determination to finish the series is far greater than the joy I take from reading the books. This would actually be a good reason to stop reading them but I really want to see if there's still a great book left in the series. I was especially disappointed by this book as it had hardly anything to do with Oz and the title is confusing as well. I guess I would much rather read something new about Oz than just having a random story about another place. Nevertheless, some of the characters were likable and I liked the part about the three pearls a lot. Unfortunately, Rinkitink annoyed me way more than he should have which is why I settled for two stars in the end. Nice but not necessary to read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Christine Shilling

    One of my favourites and better than the last few. I liked the new characters and there was a real sense of adventure. I'm a bit tired of the way Dorothy, Ozma and Glinda always show up to save the day. Even though Inga and everyone were doing fine without them, they come along and steal the glory.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sean McBride

    The ever expanding universe of the fairy kingdom of Oz continues in this book. We meet a few more brand new characters and revisit some existing. We get to see some new lands surrounding Oz proper, and we get to be a bit bored while doing it. It had become apparent earlier in the series, but in this book it becomes painfully obvious that Baum has begun to write these books because they are popular, not because he really wants to. He keeps moving farther and farther away from Oz, and only brings t The ever expanding universe of the fairy kingdom of Oz continues in this book. We meet a few more brand new characters and revisit some existing. We get to see some new lands surrounding Oz proper, and we get to be a bit bored while doing it. It had become apparent earlier in the series, but in this book it becomes painfully obvious that Baum has begun to write these books because they are popular, not because he really wants to. He keeps moving farther and farther away from Oz, and only brings the characters (Like Ozma) in to tie up his story lines. It's fun to get to experience the Nome king again, and explore that world a bit more. In fact this was the absolute best part of the story, but ultimately this was a weak story int he cannon. I'm sure he will tie these characters in, in later stories (of which he only wrote a few more), but if you don't care that much, I would just skip this one.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten Dent

    Rinkitink In Oz has definitely been one of the better books of the series so far with some stories being quite repetitive and rehash of previous stories this one offered something new. My 8 year old son enjoyed listening to his book a lot and was quite upset when he had finished it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Janelle

    This was such a fun story. I loved the characters, although Rinkitink was annoying at times with his constant laughing and references to not being able to do things because he was too fat. Oz doesn’t feature much in the story, and it carries on fine as a stand alone tale without it. But I guess as a publishing venture, it was best to keep it in the Oz franchise.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Garrett Zecker

    Doma Publishing's Wizard of Oz collection has taken me several years to read with my son at bedtime. It was interesting revisiting the texts that I read swiftly through my youth, as I was about his age when I read them and remembered little beyond some of the characters that don't appear in any of the books. I picked up a copy of this version since, for 99c, I could have the complete series along with "All the original artwork by the great illustrator W.W. Denslow (over 1,000 classic illustratio Doma Publishing's Wizard of Oz collection has taken me several years to read with my son at bedtime. It was interesting revisiting the texts that I read swiftly through my youth, as I was about his age when I read them and remembered little beyond some of the characters that don't appear in any of the books. I picked up a copy of this version since, for 99c, I could have the complete series along with "All the original artwork by the great illustrator W.W. Denslow (over 1,000 classic illustrations)", and to read the complete 14-book text at bedtime with all original color illustrations on my Kindle Fire knowing that there would be cross-linked tables of contents and no layout issues, it was worth my buck rather than taking them all out of the library. We read these books before bed at home and under the stars by a campfire in the forest, in a hotel in Montreal and in a seaside cottage in Nova Scotia, on a boat and in a car. We read it everywhere, thanks to the Kindle's mobility. You may be reading this review on one of the individual pages for the original books on Goodreads or Amazon, and if so, all I did was cross-link the books along with the correct dates we read the original texts. The only book I did not cross-link with original dates was the Woggle-bug book, which if you know, is short. Instead, I counted that final book as the review for Doma's Kindle version. You may notice that some books have longer reading spans – probably for two reasons. One, I traded off reading with my wife sometimes, and two, sometimes we needed a little Baum break and read some other books. It did get a little old sometimes, and there are fourteen books totaling 3500 pages in their original library printing. The first thing I think is worth mentioning is that when I first read these books, it was as a child would read them. I remember them being repetitive but familiar. Comforting and revealing. An antiquated adventure, but a serial adventure with recurring characters unparalleled in any other literature. As an adult with an MA in literature (and soon and MFA in fiction), I am actually somewhat unimpressed with the series. Baum wrote a whimsical set of tales, but they are torturously repetitive and would be easy to plug-and-play by replacing characters and moments with a computer to make an entirely new book. But, they are children's books, and we are completely enthralled and comforted by the familiar. Is not Shakespeare the same play-to-play structurally? Are not Pixar or Star Wars movies definitively archetypal in timing, execution, structure, and character so that they can be completely replaced and reapplied to a new story? Even the films – heck, even the trailers - are cut the same, and if you play them all at once, magic happens (see: youtube, "all star wars movies at once"). I suppose where the real magic of these books happens is in their origin. Baum wrote something completely original that took the world by storm and continues to be a whimsical American bellwether for children's fantasy. It is one of the original series specifically for children, spanning fourteen books written almost yearly and gobbled up by a hungry public. It still remains at the forefront of American culture in many revisits in Hollywood (let no one forget the horrific beauty that is Return To Oz) and capitalizing on nostalgia (as recently as six months ago I received a mailing from The Bradford Exchange that was selling original library-bound volumes signed by – get this – Baum's great-grandson... I love an autographed book if only for the idea of the magic it transmits even though it is somewhat meaningless, but maybe someone can convince me where the magic is in having it signed by a probably elderly great-grandchild who likely never met his great-grandfather?). So, while some of the books were awesome and some of them were difficult to slog through, I have my favorites. I will also say that the introductions that each volume opens with were sweet letters from the author to his fans, and it was easy to tell that he truly, truly loved his job writing for children. He knew his audience, he knew what worked, and he sold books. Furthermore, I imagined with great sentimentality mailbags upon mailbags arriving at his house filled to the brim of letters from children all over the world, and the responsibility he probably felt to personally respond to each of them. For my career, that is the best anyone can hope for. What follows is my (and my son's) short reviews of the individual books in the series. The Original and Official Oz Books by L. Frank Baum #1 The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) READ November 26, 2013 – December 1, 2013 My Kid – At first I thought it was crazy, but then it started getting awesome. I remember the movie, but there's a lot of parts that are different. Me – I mean, classic, right? The book pretty much follows the film almost entirely with few exceptions. In hindsight after finishing the entire series, it is worth nothing that it is considerably one of the best books in the series, while many others are of questionable quality. #2 The Marvelous Land of Oz (1904) READ December 1, 2013 – January 9, 2014 My Kid – It was scary... Jack Pumpkinhead and Tip escaped and it was really cool. Me – This is one of the books Return to Oz was based from, The Gump and The Powder of Life coming into play to help Dorothy and Jack Pumpkinhead outwit Mombi. An enjoyable book, quite different than the first book but engineered beautifully with plot and characterization. Enjoyed this one. What was most engaging about this text was Ozma and Tip, and what this book says about gender and youth. I think there is a lot that can be examined about gender at birth and the fluidity of gender as a social construct, witch curse or no. #3 Ozma of Oz (1907) READ January 9, 2014 – February 22, 2014 My Kid – The boat crashes and they have to ride in the box with the chicken... I like TikTok. They saved the Queen. Me – This is the second book that Return to Oz was conceived from and a very engaging book. This one requires more understanding and construction of the Oz Universe including the transformation of several of our characters into ornaments and the outwitting of the Nome King in order to save our friends. This was one of my final favorites before the quality of the books fell, as far as I am concerned. #4 Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz (1908) READ February 22, 2014 – August 12, 2014 My Kid – I kinda forgot this one. There was the vegetable people underground and nothing really happened? Me – Yeah, this one was a bust for me. I think Baum was making some kind of satirical point lost to history... Or maybe the obvious non-referential one, but still, just seemed like the episodic nonsense that didn't have a point most of the time. Keep the beginning, I guess and then skip to the final third, and there's your story. #5 The Road to Oz (1909) READ August 12, 2014 – February 22, 2015 My Kid – The love magnet was pretty awesome, and Dorothy meets the rainbow girl and Shaggy man... I guess I'll leave off there. Me – Another one that I thought was a little redundant and repetitive without much of a point. They get lost, they make it back, there are some weird artifacts that help them... Meh. I did like the new characters, however, who make many more appearances in the future books. Shaggy Man and Polychrome are great. #6 The Emerald City of Oz (1910) READ February 22, 2015 – September 14, 2015 My Kid – The Emerald City was cool and Dorothy was in charge. If I lived there I would sell it all and be rich. There was a war. Me – This one was pretty good until the end, where everything was buttoned up (apologies, button bright) pretty quickly without there being much of a solid reason. The conflicts were all contrived and there were some more ridiculously ridiculous new characters who never showed up again in the series. A great diversion, but with little substance toward the end. #7 The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1913) READ September 14, 2015 – December 22, 2015 My Kid – It was pretty weird how the quilt doll became a patchwork girl and she was really funny. In the end, it didn't matter that they found all the stuff, so it was kinda crazy and funny. Me – This was relatively silly. I enjoyed it, and the Patchwork Girl is a character I can really get behind as a foil to some of the other characters and somewhat mischievous. The plot is ridiculous, but the powder of life and the glass cat are somewhat illuminating elements of this text. Scraps made this a fun one. #8 Tik-Tok of Oz (1914) READ December 22, 2015 – April 2, 2016 My Kid – The whole story of the shaggy man's brother being missing and ugly didn’t make sense, but... there was a war and Tik Tok was rescued. There was a man who was not as evil as the other army general guys. It was weird. Me – This one was primarily about The Shaggy Man and his adventure to resolve a variety of political and interconnected issues happening surrounding everyone's messing around with the Nome King. There is a huge tube that goes through the center of the earth that everything centers on, and Shaggy is trying to get the Nome King to release his brother the whole time. There are a lot of characterization, detail, and plot errors in this that postdate some facts from the earlier books – which is kind of weird – and the intrigue surrounding the plot is somewhat complicating for kids. What I thought was the coolest element was the character of Quox, who passes more than a coincidental resemblance to Catbus from Miyazaki's Totoro. #9 The Scarecrow of Oz (1915) READ April 2, 2016 – September 1, 2016 My Kid – First of all, there's a lot of people getting lost. Second, if I was in Jinxland, I think I would rather be back in oz. Me – This one was interesting as it had little to do with The Scarecrow and was mainly about Button Bright, Cap'n Bill, and Trot. This one is probably the height of the ridiculousness, with little shallow plot item after little shallow plot item heaped upon one another. At the end, The Scarecrow has to (and succeeds) in recapturing Jinxland for Gloria, its rightful ruler, and returns to the Emerald City for a celebration. Eh... #10 Rinkitink in Oz (1916) READ September 1, 2016 – December 1, 2016 My Kid – All these books have someone wicked in them and it's so crazy. I liked the name Kaliko, and the way Dorothy comes to the rescue of everyone being clever solves the problem. What's with all the problems? I feel like there's thousands. Me – This one was pretty good, as it seemed to deviate from the regular universe of Oz and focus on a different set of locations and characters. It had a very Tolkienian feel in terms of plot, structure, and internal political commentary. It felt very different from the others, and most elements in the text had a point and a long-term purpose. I enjoyed this one. #11 The Lost Princess of Oz (1917) READ December 1, 2016 – January 19, 2017 My Kid – First of all, they've gotta be responsible for the diamond pan, and that's why they lost it. They weren't responsible. At the end they searched for the tools and didn't need them and it was useless. Me – Lost Princess was fun. It surrounded the story of Ozma being kidnapped and the Wizard, Button Bright, Trot, and Betsy Bobbin to go rescue her. Everything in this one felt a little random, but it all ties back together in the end. This one was pretty diversionary but not as bad as some of the others. #12 The Tin Woodman of Oz (1918) READ January 19, 2017 – March 13, 2017 My Kid – Woot is a weird name, and everyone was changed to animals and monkeys and none of them matched up. It was all pretty weird because they all had their new needs as animals and it didn't match with what they were. The love story was kinda weird since the girl didn't want the tin woodmen anymore and the fact that they left and it was all for nothing didn't make sense. Me – A lot of randomness in this one as well, but there is a love story at its core as we learn of a twin brother that the Tin Woodman had all along who shares the love of a long lost young lady named Nimee Amee. A lot of diversionary stories, adventures, and one cool twist by the end, and everyone arrives back where they started. Not the best, but entertaining. This one, while random at times, was a quality read. #13 The Magic of Oz (1919) READ March 13, 2017 – April 25, 2017 My Kid – I wish you could transform yourself. Like... What if you wanted to turn yourself into a pea shooter from Plants Vs Zombies? I don't even know how to pronounce the word. I never heard of it, this nonsense word. Me – This one had a funny gimmick in it with a secret word that when spoken could turn anyone into anything. There is a war on, and a secret force is transforming monkeys into superhuman soldiers (and there is a complication that no one in oz can be hurt but what happens when someone is chopped into a hundred living pieces?). This one was enjoyable, but the gimmick is honestly the only thing holding it all together. #14 Glinda of Oz (1920) READ April 25, 2017 – May 23, 2017 My Kid – This one was kinda like a world of them figuring out what is going on with the big glass house-world under-water. The opposite of everything and they couldn't figure out how to get it back to normal, so what was going on with the war the whole time? Then they fix it. Everything is all set. Me – This posthumous volume seemed to be pieced together from notes, as there is a clear difference between the tone of prior volumes and this one. The cadence and structure of the language and story is quite different in parts, and I found it takes itself seriously by comparison. Beautiful art and architecture present this journey, and I have to say, the fact that this was in new hands really shows because there is some wonderful structure that is absent in the other volumes, as well as even reintroductions to the characters when they show up. The end was a little too tidy with another deus ex machina, but the fact that it came from something that was surprising and there all along was different. *BONUS Oz Works by L. Frank Baum, 'the Royal Historian of Oz' The Woggle-Bug Book (1905) READ May 23, 2017 – May 24, 2017 My Kid – Actually, I don't have a review for my kid... See below. Me – This book started cute and had a cute premise. When I began reading it at bedtime, the kid had fallen asleep. I tend to keep reading and save our spot, and then pick it up where he fell asleep the next night. Lucky for me, the terrifyingly racist parlance in this book started after he fell asleep. I read through to the end, with no intention of going back with him tomorrow... It was... shockingly indifferent to complete disregard for everyone. From switching between "Oriental" and "Chinaman" and having a character with a dialect that wasn't just a stereotype but also a stereotype of a racist's impression wasn't nearly as bad as the way Baum used the N-word (and had the character as a monkey's monkey). It was offensive and seemed ridiculously gratuitous for even the time it was published. Not a shining moment for his work at all... But it was pretty cool to learn the Woggle Bug was from Boston, anyway. This one was pretty awful.

  16. 4 out of 5

    hpboy13

    A very interesting book, because almost all the action and all of the characters are not from Oz. Rather this expands the world Baum has created, and we get to see more of the outlying countries, and we see that the new Gnome King is not that much better than the old one. ETA 2018: I remembered really liking Rinkitink in Oz as a kid, and I stand by that opinion. Despite (or perhaps due to) only a tenuous connection with Oz, this is a very compelling fantasy about a boy trying to rescue his parent A very interesting book, because almost all the action and all of the characters are not from Oz. Rather this expands the world Baum has created, and we get to see more of the outlying countries, and we see that the new Gnome King is not that much better than the old one. ETA 2018: I remembered really liking Rinkitink in Oz as a kid, and I stand by that opinion. Despite (or perhaps due to) only a tenuous connection with Oz, this is a very compelling fantasy about a boy trying to rescue his parents against all odds. The book does several things well that only a few of the Oz books achieve: very formidable antagonists (Gos and Cor), true and frightening peril for the protagonists, and an emotional arc that drives the story. As I commented in my review of The Patchwork Girl of Oz, Baum’s writing is much less annoyingly saccharine when he’s working with a male POV; Inga’s reserved nature proved a perfect vehicle for this story. In a cool way, this book also serves to pay homage to the one that started it all: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz – for example, there are the enchanted shoes that convey great power and protect from harm, and everything is fueled by a desire to reunite with family. Honestly, the weakest part of the book was the deus ex Magic Picture that plagues the later Oz books – everything is solved at the last moment by Ozma or Dorothy stumbling upon the protagonist while channel-surfing, and deciding to rescue them. It sort of cheapens all the drama of what came before. I also think Baum got a little carried away writing rhymes and songs here – or perhaps I just prefer the poetic stylings of Scraps to Rinkitink.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Marti

    I have to give this book four stars because it is an old favorite. This particular volume, printed in 1916, belonged to our mother, and was recently restored for us by daughter Susan's friend Marianna, who is also a Goodreads member. She did an excellent job. The hero is Prince Inga of Pingaree, who has the misfortune to have his parents captured and enslaved by the King and Queen of Regos and Coregos. He was up in a tree reading when the raid ensued, and two others who were overlooked were King I have to give this book four stars because it is an old favorite. This particular volume, printed in 1916, belonged to our mother, and was recently restored for us by daughter Susan's friend Marianna, who is also a Goodreads member. She did an excellent job. The hero is Prince Inga of Pingaree, who has the misfortune to have his parents captured and enslaved by the King and Queen of Regos and Coregos. He was up in a tree reading when the raid ensued, and two others who were overlooked were King Rinkitink and his talking goat, Bilbil, who happened to be visiting. The adventure begins after the three magic pearls are unearthed. Great fun!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I always liked this story as a child because it features Inga, one of the few male protagonists of Baum's I could stomach (he's a reader and a daydreamer, which Baum apologizes for, saying as a prince he never had the opportunities to rough-house with other boys). This is a fun romp with a Dorothy-ex-machina ending an a very unfortunate interlude in which a goat is turned back into a human by stages--from a goat to a a "higher order of animal" to a "lesser order of human" and then to a "full hum I always liked this story as a child because it features Inga, one of the few male protagonists of Baum's I could stomach (he's a reader and a daydreamer, which Baum apologizes for, saying as a prince he never had the opportunities to rough-house with other boys). This is a fun romp with a Dorothy-ex-machina ending an a very unfortunate interlude in which a goat is turned back into a human by stages--from a goat to a a "higher order of animal" to a "lesser order of human" and then to a "full human" (*shudder*) It puts rather a damper on the whole book, sadly.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    One of the better Oz books. Gets away from the tired formula of the others for a while.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jason Pettus

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com:]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegally. This review covers all 14 of the Baum Oz books, which is why it's found on all 14 book pages here.) I think it's fairly safe by now to assume that nearly everyone in Western society is familiar with The Wizard of Oz, most of us because of the classic 1939 movie adaptation; and many realize as well tha (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com:]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegally. This review covers all 14 of the Baum Oz books, which is why it's found on all 14 book pages here.) I think it's fairly safe by now to assume that nearly everyone in Western society is familiar with The Wizard of Oz, most of us because of the classic 1939 movie adaptation; and many realize as well that author L. Frank Baum ended up penning a whole series of sequels, because of the original book's astounding success back at the turn of the 20th century when it was first published -- 13 sequels altogether, before his death in 1919, which after the movie's success twenty years later became a literal merchandising empire, spawning hundreds more official sequels by various authors and hundreds more unofficial ones once the characters moved into the public domain. And like many others, I've always been interested in what these 14 "canonical" Oz books have to say; and that's why I decided this winter to sit down and read them all in a row for the first time, easy to do because of them being available for free at both Project Gutenberg and the email subscription service DailyLit (which is how I myself read them, and in fact is how I read many of the older books you see reviewed here; I'm a big fan of theirs, and highly recommend them). But of course, to even approach these books with the right mindset, it's important to understand that like so many other one-hit-wonders, Baum was not only eluded by success in most of his other endeavors but was an active failure at them -- in the 1870s, for example, he unsuccessfully tried his hand at breeding fancy poultry (a national fad at the time), then in the 1880s opened his own theatre and became one of the first-ever Americans to produce modern-style stage musicals, apparently a little too ahead of its time, then in the 1890s moved to the Dakota Territory and opened a dry-goods store that eventually failed, as well as starting a newspaper that folded too. So it was sort of a case of random lightning in a bottle when he decided in the late 1890s to try his hand at children's literature, and ended up with his very first title being the most popular kid's book in America for two years straight, and no surprise that Baum then spent the rest of his life desperately trying to figure out how to bottle that lightning again. Because now that I've read it myself, I can confirm that the original Wonderful Wizard of Oz is astonishingly great, a sort of miraculous combination of traits that makes for an almost perfect children's story; and although most of it follows the same storyline seen in the '39 movie, there are also significant differences, making it worth your while to sit and read the book version if you have the interest. (And by the way, for some really interesting reading, check out the academic analysis that was done of this book in the 1960s, arguing that most of its details symbolically correspond almost exactly to various political and economic issues of the late 1800s, including the yellow brick road representing the much-discussed gold standard of that age, the scarecrow representing the then-hot Populist Party, Toto representing the teetotaler [prohibitionist:] movement, and a lot more.) But of course, there are a couple of details about this book that have been forgotten over the decades too, which also help explain its record-shattering success -- it was an unusually lavish book for its time, for example, with two-toned illustrations on every page and several full-color plates, and let's also not forget that Baum himself mounted a Broadway-style musical of Oz just two years after the book was published, a huge hit which toured nationally for a decade and that was even more insanely popular than the book itself (including making national stars out of vaudeville performers Fred Stone and David Montgomery, playing the Scarecrow and Tin Man; the stage production left out the Cowardly Lion altogether, which is why he is also barely seen in any of the 13 canonical sequels). And so that's why when Baum attempted starting up other fantasy series in the wake of Oz's success, hoping to turn all of them into lucrative franchises like the original, the audience mostly responded with yawns; and that's why Baum eventually went back to writing more and more Oz books as the 20th century continued, because by now the strength of the brand far outweighed the relative writing skills of Baum when it came to any particular volume. That's why, at least to adults, it's perhaps actually the introductions to each book that are the most fascinating thing about them; because to be frank, most of the books follow a pretty familiar formula, with a danger-filled quest involving various kooky characters that is usually finished about two-thirds of the way through, followed by a massive parade or party that lets Baum trot out the growing number of main characters added to this universe with each title. (And by the way, prepare yourself for Baum's unending love of the deus-ex-machina plot device; over half the books end along the lines of, "And then our heroes took possession of a super-duper magical device, which they waved in the air and all their troubles went away.") In fact, for those who don't know, that's why the official map of Oz and its surrounding lands eventually grew so large, because Baum still hadn't given up on his dream of having a whole series of kid-lit cash cows out there generating revenue for him, and so would use many of these Oz sequels to introduce entirely new casts of characters who live in entirely new lands, "just over the mountains" or "just past the desert" of Oz itself. By the end of the original 14 books, in fact, Baum had built up a virtual aristocracy of licensable characters, all of whom would have to be dragged out for a cameo at some point in each book to remind the audience of their existence -- not just the cast of the original book and '39 movie but also various other princesses like Ozma and Betsy Bobbin, boy characters like Ojo the Unlucky and Button Bright, adults who help them like the Shaggy Man, Cap'n Bill and Ugu the Shoemaker, and of course a whole litany of quirky fantastical sidekicks, including but not limited to Tik-Tok, Jack Pumpkinhead, the Great Jinjin, Billina the Angry Hen, Scraps the Patchwork Girl, and Polychrome the Rainbow Fairy. Whew! And so did the Great Oz Merchandising Experiment keep limping along for two decades, with each sequel selling less and less and getting lazier and lazier (for example, the tenth book in the series, 1916's Rinkitink in Oz, was actually a non-Oz book written a decade previous, published almost unchanged except for a hasty final chapter full of Oz regulars slapped onto the end); and thus did Baum's bad luck in business come back with a vengeance as well, with three more Broadway productions that were all flops, and even the establishment of a film production company in 1914 that eventually went bankrupt. You can see the progression of all this reflected in Baum's first-person introductions to each book, which like I said is why they might be the most fascinating parts of all for adult readers -- how in the first sequel, for example, he expresses legitimately gleeful surprise and joy at how passionate his fans were, and how thousands of children had literally written to him out of the blue demanding more Oz stories, while with each subsequent sequel his tone becomes more and more snarky, ala "Well, dear and wonderful children, you've yet again demanded another Oz book like the sheep you are, so here it is, you screeching little monsters." In fact, in book six of the series, 1910's The Emerald City of Oz, Baum flat-out states that it's going to be the very last Oz book, and it's no coincidence that many fans actually consider this one to be the best of the original fourteen, because of Baum's extra attention to and enthusiasm for this particular storyline, thinking as he erroneously did that it would be the grand finale of the entire Oz universe; but after his later financial failures forced him back into the Oz business again, the gloves finally come off in his introductions, with most of the rest sounding to today's ears something like, "Well, okay, here again is the sugary teat you all apparently can't get enough of suckling, you infuriating little animals, so open wide and take your medicine." Now, of course, you shouldn't feel too bad for Baum; by the last years of his life, his combined books and plays were generating for him in today's terms roughly a quarter-million dollars a year just in personal royalties. So all in all, an experience I'm glad I had, reading all fourteen original Oz books in a row, but not something I'd recommend to others; instead, maybe better just to read the first, then skip to the sixth, then skip straight to the 14th, 1920's Glinda of Oz, because of its unusual darkness (probably caused, many scholars agree, by Baum knowing that he was near death). As with many authors I've looked at here at CCLaP, history seems to have correctly adjusted itself in Baum's case, with most of his books now rightfully falling into the obscurity they deserve, even while his one true masterpiece is still rightfully recognized as such.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Rinkitink in Oz is the tenth book in the Oz series written by L. Frank Baum and centered on Prince Inga of Pingaree, along with the visiting King Rinkitink and Bilbi the goat to rescue his parents and save his subjects of his kingdom from invaders. Lyman Frank Baum died two hundred years ago this May (6 May, 1919) and in commemoration of this event, I thought it would be apropos to read his magnum opus – the Oz series, which I hope to read this month. Pingaree is an island in the Nonestic Ocean th Rinkitink in Oz is the tenth book in the Oz series written by L. Frank Baum and centered on Prince Inga of Pingaree, along with the visiting King Rinkitink and Bilbi the goat to rescue his parents and save his subjects of his kingdom from invaders. Lyman Frank Baum died two hundred years ago this May (6 May, 1919) and in commemoration of this event, I thought it would be apropos to read his magnum opus – the Oz series, which I hope to read this month. Pingaree is an island in the Nonestic Ocean that surrounds the fairy countries that encircle the Deadly Desert that surrounds the Land of Oz. Who was kept save from three pearls that was given to the kingdom by mermaids. The blue pearl gives superhuman strength, the pink pearl protects the holder invulnerability, and the white pearl provided words of wisdom. King Kitticut and Queen Garee, the current rulers of Pingaree, welcomed King Rinkitink of Gilgad, a jovial and pleasantly plump fellow on royal holiday, who remains on the island as Kitticut's guest for several weeks. Rinkitink's companion, other than the rowers from Gilgad, is a surly goat named Bilbil who seems to be Rinkitink's opposite in attitude. Invaders from Regos and Coregos come again to Pingaree and seize the king before he can grab the pearls. All of the buildings are torn down, and all of the people are carried into slavery. The only ones remaining on the island are Inga, Prince of Pingaree, who was able to inadvertently hide by climbing a tree, Rinkitink, who escaped his pursuers by falling into a well, and Bilbil the goat whom the invaders did not see any value of. Inga realizes the only way he will be able to free his family and people is with the help of the magic pearls, so he comes to the palace floor to retrieve them. To make sure the pearls are not lost, he hides one each in the toes of his shoes and carries the speaking White Pearl with him. The White Pearl guides him to a boat the following morning, which he, Bilbil, and Rinkitink begin to row toward the island of Regos. Regos and Coregos are respectively ruled by a wicked king and queen, King Gos and Queen Cor. These two ruthless tyrants see no reason they cannot capture and enslave Inga and his companions as they did the rest of Pingaree's inhabitants. It is up to these two royals and a talking goat to rescue Pingaree from these wicked rulers. Rinkitink in Oz is written rather well. Baum's imagination continues to broaden the Wonderful Word of Oz, which includes the islands on the Nonestic Ocean, which surrounds Oz. The narrative is rather interesting as most of it is taken place outside of Oz and mainly takes place on three islands: Pingaree, Regos, and Coregos, and within the Nome King's caverns. In fact, no one from Oz appears in the narrative until its climax. All in all, Rinkitink in Oz is written rather well and is a good continuation to what would hopefully be a wonderful series, which I plan to continue in the very near future.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tinka

    #OzAThon Book 10 Ah, fuck it! He blew it in the end! Reading this book was fascinating compared to the last few, because it was never intended to be an Oz Book in the first place. And believe me, it was refreshing. Here we have the story of a young Prince, the irresponsible King from a neighbor country and his grumpy goat, setting out to save the Prince’s parents and kingdom from being enslaved by another, cruel royal couple. It is a fantasy story that can absolutely stand on its own, with quirky #OzAThon Book 10 Ah, fuck it! He blew it in the end! Reading this book was fascinating compared to the last few, because it was never intended to be an Oz Book in the first place. And believe me, it was refreshing. Here we have the story of a young Prince, the irresponsible King from a neighbor country and his grumpy goat, setting out to save the Prince’s parents and kingdom from being enslaved by another, cruel royal couple. It is a fantasy story that can absolutely stand on its own, with quirky new characters and an actual interesting set up that most of the time is paced well and enjoyable to read. The characters of Prince Inga (the book at least taught me my name is apparently gender neutral, huh), King Rinkitink and Bilbil are likeable enough to follow and their misadventures are. The goat is the best character, let’s face it. And we could have had it all, if it weren’t for the awfully forced tie-ins with the rest of the Oz series. I went into this knowing it was made part of the official canon, but part of me hoped the location drop in the beginning would be the only time it actually related to the rest of series. That would have been weird, but better than what we got in the end. It was fun and games until Dorothy and the other name drops entered the story for no fucking reason other than to turn this standalone into part of the series. Why? Why couldn’t this be just a different book? The story did not benefit at all from being turned into part of the Oz canon and the last few chapter felt so forced and unnecessary then ruined what could have been a perfectly fine fantasy book. Besides, Dorothy doesn’t come off as too well here. She watches Prince Inga and his friends suffering for who knows how long, feels sorry, forgets about it and only decides to help when randomly decides to magically stalk them again. Way to go Miss Gale, you are a jerk. And please, I don’t want another line about how lovely and perfect Ozma is. I enjoyed the book to the point where the Oz parts were forced into it and then it fell apart. I went into this knowing it was an Oz book, but I really wish it wasn’t.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bob Newman

    Oz-stensibly about that famous land The pearl-laden seas around the island of Pingaree produce a wealthy kingdom, ruled by a serious, just king and queen. Their rather androgynous son (at least in John R. Neill's drawings) hopes to succeed them. But barbarian hordes from two islands to the north, looting, destructive invaders very much resembling Vikings, destroy the peaceful kingdom and enslave the whole people, carrying them off to labor in the islands of Regos and Coregos ruled by an evil king Oz-stensibly about that famous land The pearl-laden seas around the island of Pingaree produce a wealthy kingdom, ruled by a serious, just king and queen. Their rather androgynous son (at least in John R. Neill's drawings) hopes to succeed them. But barbarian hordes from two islands to the north, looting, destructive invaders very much resembling Vikings, destroy the peaceful kingdom and enslave the whole people, carrying them off to labor in the islands of Regos and Coregos ruled by an evil king and queen and inhabited by monsters and wild beasts. The son, plus the visiting king Rinkitink--fat and inclined to bad poetry--are the only survivors left in Pingaree. Oh, and then there's the king's talking goat, Bilbil. There are some excellent characters here. RINKITINK IN OZ is the story of how things played out. Will young Prince Inga be able to free his parents and people ? How will he do it? Who is Zella and what kind of shoes has she got? Magic is involved of course. This Oz book is unique in that the usual cast of Oz characters appear only on page 275 (out of 320 and that is probably because Baum was under pressure to get them in by hook or by crook. The Nome King (new model) gets a part, but Dorothy and the gang are just there to wind things up. Perhaps the adventure is faster-moving than in some of the other Oz books, but if you long for more doings of the Scarecrow, Tin Woodman, Ozma, et.al., you might be a tad disappointed. Otherwise, it was and is a great read for anyone who liked Baum's books. Whether such adventures can lure the young away from video games, Youtube, and reality TV, I will leave up to you.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Louise-Andree

    3.75 or 4*; I am undecided. This book doesn't feel like an Oz book but the author still has a mismatch group of characters on an adventure with a mission to find and rescue one's parents and people of Oz only come up by the last few chapters of the book. Mainly Dorothy but it feels like the author had to make her the heroine here but it was unecessary, I feel, since basically everything was resolving itself and by the main characters already. Oh well. It was still a strong book none the less. The 3.75 or 4*; I am undecided. This book doesn't feel like an Oz book but the author still has a mismatch group of characters on an adventure with a mission to find and rescue one's parents and people of Oz only come up by the last few chapters of the book. Mainly Dorothy but it feels like the author had to make her the heroine here but it was unecessary, I feel, since basically everything was resolving itself and by the main characters already. Oh well. It was still a strong book none the less. The title of this book is still sort of misleading but Rinkitink is an important character throughout this book, unlike the other previously misleading titled books. He has a very annoying sense of humour and laugh though. Geez. I just wanted to slap him accross the face multiple times. Also, it might be just me and the fact I didn't listen to the book from beginning to end in one go but every time Inga was mentioned, I had to do a double take and wonder why Inga and "he/him..." were in the same sentence. I am so used to hearing/reading the name being linked to a woman/girl that it confused me here and took me out of the story for a couple minutes. Oh well. This is book 10; the author intended only 6 books for Oz but he was so bombarded by fan letters that he had to keep going but it is starting to feel like he's reaching with adding Dorothy at the end just so the reader remembers this is still happening in the Oz land/universe. Let's hope the other 4 books are good; it would be sad to end this collection with bad reviews, you know.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Emilie

    NO, Just NO! This book was horrible, I saw absolutely no point to its existence what so ever. Rinkitink was not funny, only a jackass who doesn’t care about his people and says stuff like “there are worse things than being a slave”, okay mr privilege king, please tell me what those things are? And since we’re on it, maybe you could take over for one of the slaves then since you don’t seem to mind. Also, I know apparently Oz is only for white little kids but for the author to actually in this boo NO, Just NO! This book was horrible, I saw absolutely no point to its existence what so ever. Rinkitink was not funny, only a jackass who doesn’t care about his people and says stuff like “there are worse things than being a slave”, okay mr privilege king, please tell me what those things are? And since we’re on it, maybe you could take over for one of the slaves then since you don’t seem to mind. Also, I know apparently Oz is only for white little kids but for the author to actually in this book create a malicious portrait of black people and call them “less than human” was just – ARE YOU SERIOUS?! As I’ve said before, no I don’t care that the book is old, people have always had feelings and been discriminated against. If the rest of the series will be like this, I will give it up!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    Another fine Oz story from the original series. The grandsons enjoyed listening to it and I enjoyed reading it to them. New characters were introduced with their own sets of problems and other familiar characters make appearances as well. Lots of new places to explore and problems to solve, sometimes with magic and sometimes just with brains and luck. L. Frank Baum keeps the stories fun and relatable and the characters flawed but endearing. You will find yourself rooting for some of them and hop Another fine Oz story from the original series. The grandsons enjoyed listening to it and I enjoyed reading it to them. New characters were introduced with their own sets of problems and other familiar characters make appearances as well. Lots of new places to explore and problems to solve, sometimes with magic and sometimes just with brains and luck. L. Frank Baum keeps the stories fun and relatable and the characters flawed but endearing. You will find yourself rooting for some of them and hoping for a good thrashing for others. Only five more to go and I will have read all 15 to them. It has been fun. Recommend to all who like lighthearted fun fantasy for kids with some relevant lessons along the way.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Suren Oganessian

    So apparently someone wrote a fix-fic of this called King Rinkitink back in 2017, published by the International Wizard of Oz club, that deletes the deus ex machina Oz ending and tries to make it more like the original manuscript. I want to read that version, because it sounds like it fixes all the problems this book has. It's a pretty solid book throughout, even ahead of it's time in many ways. The part where Prince Inga is navigating through a lava chamber makes me feel like The Legend of Zeld So apparently someone wrote a fix-fic of this called King Rinkitink back in 2017, published by the International Wizard of Oz club, that deletes the deus ex machina Oz ending and tries to make it more like the original manuscript. I want to read that version, because it sounds like it fixes all the problems this book has. It's a pretty solid book throughout, even ahead of it's time in many ways. The part where Prince Inga is navigating through a lava chamber makes me feel like The Legend of Zelda games owe a debt to Baum. It's really barely an Oz book, but you won't care once you get into it. But, by the time Oz characters do show up, it's annoying and ruins the climax. Such is life I suppose; at least Baum found some way to publish it, and I'm glad he did.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    If Baum had just had the courage of his convictions - or not been looking to make a quick buck - we might laud King Rinkitink as the best of his non-Oz fantasies today. As it is, we don't know why he abandoned the book originally, but he chose to revive it as an Oz story by slapping a brand new ending on that functioned as a deus ex machina, reintroducing favorite old characters and dragging everyone to the Emerald City. Effectively, it ruins what has up to that point been a superlative fantasy- If Baum had just had the courage of his convictions - or not been looking to make a quick buck - we might laud King Rinkitink as the best of his non-Oz fantasies today. As it is, we don't know why he abandoned the book originally, but he chose to revive it as an Oz story by slapping a brand new ending on that functioned as a deus ex machina, reintroducing favorite old characters and dragging everyone to the Emerald City. Effectively, it ruins what has up to that point been a superlative fantasy-adventure novel. I didn't like the book much as a child because there wasn't a lot of Oz in it, but today, I can see it for what it is. I wish I could read Baum's original version because I'm sure that was even better.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Professor

    Seems pretty clear that Oz had a Rinkitink novel that he couldn't sell, so he slammed a few Oz chapters onto the end to be able to publish it, but it's of little consequence, as the strange story of how jolly old King Rinkitink came to the peaceful island of pearl fishers and helps young Prince Inga rescue his parents and people from the tyrants of Cor and Regos is a hell of a lot of fun. MicroMort was especially fond of Bilbil the goat and Rinkitink. My only word of warning is that there's more Seems pretty clear that Oz had a Rinkitink novel that he couldn't sell, so he slammed a few Oz chapters onto the end to be able to publish it, but it's of little consequence, as the strange story of how jolly old King Rinkitink came to the peaceful island of pearl fishers and helps young Prince Inga rescue his parents and people from the tyrants of Cor and Regos is a hell of a lot of fun. MicroMort was especially fond of Bilbil the goat and Rinkitink. My only word of warning is that there's more violence here than in some of the other later Oz books, so beware-it's more human against human violence, as well, so this one may be more appropriate for slightly older Oz fans.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

    Hands down, one of the best Oz books of the first ten! Rinkitink is a pudgy king who doesn't really want to rule his country so he visits Pingaree and makes friends with the ruler there. An invasion in Pingaree causes all the inhabitants to be taken as slaves to the islands of Regos and Coregos, ruled by a married king and queen each living on their own island. The only ones left on Pingaree are Rinkitink, his goat Bilbil, and Prince Inga. The story was so well produced and the plot line worked s Hands down, one of the best Oz books of the first ten! Rinkitink is a pudgy king who doesn't really want to rule his country so he visits Pingaree and makes friends with the ruler there. An invasion in Pingaree causes all the inhabitants to be taken as slaves to the islands of Regos and Coregos, ruled by a married king and queen each living on their own island. The only ones left on Pingaree are Rinkitink, his goat Bilbil, and Prince Inga. The story was so well produced and the plot line worked so well. Also, I just really enjoyed getting to know the characters in this. I am very pleased and had fun reading it to my sons as well.

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