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The Book Of The Dead: By E. A. Wallis Budge - Illustrated (Comes with a Free Audiobook)

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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books The Book of the Dead is an ancient Egyptian funerary text, used from the beginning of the New Kingdom How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books The Book of the Dead is an ancient Egyptian funerary text, used from the beginning of the New Kingdom (around 1550 BCE) to around 50 BCE. The original Egyptian name for the text, transliterated rw nw prt m hrw is translated as Book of Coming Forth by Day. Another translation would be Book of emerging forth into the Light. "Book" is the closest term to describe the loose collection of texts consisting of a number of magic spells intended to assist a dead person's journey through the Duat, or underworld, and into the afterlife and written by many priests over a period of about 1000 years.


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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books The Book of the Dead is an ancient Egyptian funerary text, used from the beginning of the New Kingdom How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books The Book of the Dead is an ancient Egyptian funerary text, used from the beginning of the New Kingdom (around 1550 BCE) to around 50 BCE. The original Egyptian name for the text, transliterated rw nw prt m hrw is translated as Book of Coming Forth by Day. Another translation would be Book of emerging forth into the Light. "Book" is the closest term to describe the loose collection of texts consisting of a number of magic spells intended to assist a dead person's journey through the Duat, or underworld, and into the afterlife and written by many priests over a period of about 1000 years.

30 review for The Book Of The Dead: By E. A. Wallis Budge - Illustrated (Comes with a Free Audiobook)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Hadrian

    The edition of the Egyptian Book of the Dead published by Criterion Press is a real prize of a book. It's almost a square foot in size, and contains an almost-full size color facsimile of the Papyrus of Ani, with the original text in ancient Egyptian. I can't judge on the accuracy of the translation, but the English text flows smoothly, and the hieroglyphs appear distinct (at least in the 1994 edition - I can't say for the 2008 reprint). The Book of the Dead, or the Book of Coming Forth By Day, The edition of the Egyptian Book of the Dead published by Criterion Press is a real prize of a book. It's almost a square foot in size, and contains an almost-full size color facsimile of the Papyrus of Ani, with the original text in ancient Egyptian. I can't judge on the accuracy of the translation, but the English text flows smoothly, and the hieroglyphs appear distinct (at least in the 1994 edition - I can't say for the 2008 reprint). The Book of the Dead, or the Book of Coming Forth By Day, is a funerary text of the ancient Egyptian religion. It's not a comprehensive source on ancient Egyptian religion, and it would be a mistake to call it a 'Bible' or any equivalent. Instead, it is a collection of texts and spells to be used by the individual after they die so that they would enjoy the afterlife. This text is still interesting to the lay person (like me) who has almost no scholarly experience with ancient Egypt, as it gives some insight into the images which the ancient Egyptians used in their thought, and what sorts of things they considered right and wrong. There is an extended 'anti-Confession' of wrongdoings which the person was supposed to have not done in order to gain immortality. This edition also has the texts in other versions of the Book of the Dead (there wasn't a standardized version) as well as several essays describing the names and concepts within. I, in my limited capacity, can seriously recommend it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Horace Derwent

    i read this about 16 years ago(in the early spring of 2001), i just felt my brain had been turned into porridge as i finished reading it in the end, now i still can't figure out how many stars i can give to rate this book, but i remember that there were many stars around my head when i was reading this book, and that's all my review for this :)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    How can you not give this 5 stars when it lays out for you the exact procedure one needs to follow to ensure one's entrance into the afterlife

  4. 5 out of 5

    Czarny Pies

    This work is a historical document of enormous importance for the understanding of the theology and beliefs of pharaonic Egypt which is why I am giving it five stars. It has no literary, philosophical or theological values per se. A Book of Dead is a collection of spells inserted in the tomb of a deceased person that he or she is to use in the journey to the afterworld. Reading them is a rather peculiar experience It is like reading a holy litany rather than reciting it out loud. Nonetheless for This work is a historical document of enormous importance for the understanding of the theology and beliefs of pharaonic Egypt which is why I am giving it five stars. It has no literary, philosophical or theological values per se. A Book of Dead is a collection of spells inserted in the tomb of a deceased person that he or she is to use in the journey to the afterworld. Reading them is a rather peculiar experience It is like reading a holy litany rather than reciting it out loud. Nonetheless for the reader determined to learn more about ancient Egypt, the exercise is very worthwhile. Having been aware for many years of the strange anthropomorphic pantheon of Egyptian Gods typically possessing animal heads with human bodies, I had considered pharaonic religion to be rather primitive. Reading it has led me to wonder if it in fact it is not reasonably close to modern religions. Wallis Budge the translator and editor of the version that I read believed that Egyptian religion was fundamentally monotheistic and promoted a moral code of conduct. The least that can be said is that this translation supports this thesis very well. Budge's book is an absolute delight. The words of his English text are placed below the original hieroglyphs which serves to add an element of visual enjoyment that considerably livens the very dull text. I read the Book of the Dead because of a deeply ingrained prejudice that I acquired as an undergraduate in history that in order to study history one must read contemporary documents and literature in addition to the works of modern historians. The experience has provided considerable insight into the challenges faced by professional historians in drawing conclusions about pharaonic religion. The one thing that I have taken away is that it is more sophisticated than I had previously believed.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kellyanne

    Hello! Ok first off your not going to understand all of this book.. The less schooled persons of ancient Egyptian culture will probably not even know 50% of this novel. I have been learning hieroglyphs and ancient Egyptian., so this book was amazing to me, one fact above all others is that you are holding in your hands an ancient guide for the dearly departed.. The trouble many scholars went through over the years to translate this book was harrowing and seemed fruitless... Especially when Cham Hello! Ok first off your not going to understand all of this book.. The less schooled persons of ancient Egyptian culture will probably not even know 50% of this novel. I have been learning hieroglyphs and ancient Egyptian., so this book was amazing to me, one fact above all others is that you are holding in your hands an ancient guide for the dearly departed.. The trouble many scholars went through over the years to translate this book was harrowing and seemed fruitless... Especially when Champollion (yes one of the discoverers of the Rosetta Stone) realized he was translating it all wrong!! When e Wallace budge came along, the inscriptions were translated the correct way.. But so much mystery surrounds this book and the culture itself... To start reading this book with the notion that you will understand everything within the pages is stupidity.. Just relax and just accept the fact that there is great understanding in the things that you don't understand.. If you can grasp that concept then challenge yourself with this one.. It is more than a book, but an experience of the senses .., Happy readings!' May god bless you, in the here, now and the after....

  6. 5 out of 5

    TheSkepticalReader

    Because this isn’t so much of a book you read from start to end like any other, it took me almost two years to finish this. Having purchased this because of my childhood fascination with Ancient Egyptian culture, this was completely worth the read. The introduction was incredible helpful and, as far as I can tell, translation was good as well. I would only recommend this to someone who is really willing to put the time, patience, and energy into learning more about this culture. There is a lot o Because this isn’t so much of a book you read from start to end like any other, it took me almost two years to finish this. Having purchased this because of my childhood fascination with Ancient Egyptian culture, this was completely worth the read. The introduction was incredible helpful and, as far as I can tell, translation was good as well. I would only recommend this to someone who is really willing to put the time, patience, and energy into learning more about this culture. There is a lot of material that can feel receptive and dull but keep in mind that this is a collection gathering over 2,000 years of an Ancient culture.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Barnaby Thieme

    This is a beautiful book - a large-format facsimile reproduction of the Papyrus of Ani in large color images with translation of the hieroglyphs beneath. The pictures comprising the bulk of the book are not of the Papyrus itself, held in the British National Museum; rather it is a reproduction of a carefully-made imitation of the original. The translation is quite readable and there are several useful essays and commentaries written by competent egyptologists. Because of the compositional unity This is a beautiful book - a large-format facsimile reproduction of the Papyrus of Ani in large color images with translation of the hieroglyphs beneath. The pictures comprising the bulk of the book are not of the Papyrus itself, held in the British National Museum; rather it is a reproduction of a carefully-made imitation of the original. The translation is quite readable and there are several useful essays and commentaries written by competent egyptologists. Because of the compositional unity of hieroglyphic writing and accompanying illustrations, it is highly desirable to read a translation like this which lavishes attention on the presentation of the images. The text itself is a well-preserved specimen of a genre of funerary texts referred to in aggregate as "The Book of Going Forth by Day". It is a collection of spells and instructions buried with wealthy Egyptians to assist them in penetrating to the Hall of Two Truths where they could submit themselves to be judged for a proper dispensation in the afterlife. Most of the text is an assortment of miscellaneous incantations and lists of formulae to be recited at the appropriate time to the various guardians. There is a great deal of material here of considerable interest to the student of mythology. Because the Egyptians provided very little in the way of religious narrative, most of what we know about their beliefs is extrapolated from texts like this work, and similar collections of funerary writings such as the Pyramid Texts an Coffin Texts. This particular scroll was prepared for a wealthy scribe named Ani. It is a good specimen but does not contain every chapter found in the genre. A very useful supplement is included in this volume which presents the chapters not contained herein which are found in the Theban recension of this work. This is a superb volume by every metric and it is an absolute cornerstone of the study of Egyptian religion.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Eric Hertenstein

    I can't really rate this book, because I didn't really understand it. But it's really funny if you take it literally, you know, like, "Boat bird staff staff, eye dog bird staff man reed boat!" And also it's an interesting window into the rituals of an ancient blah, blah . . .

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elliot A

    A wealth of information. I struggled a bit, though, because it assumes a working knowledge of the culture, history and religion of the ancient Egyptians. Nevertheless, the introduction was long enough to be a book in itself and was very helpful in gaining greater insight into a topic that has fascinated me for years. The inclusion of the hieroglyphics with the translation underneath each line were a great treat. ElliotScribbles

  10. 4 out of 5

    Crito

    The Egyptian Book of the Dead is a set of rituals and incantations from an ancient civilization, and that will immediately set anyone’s interest or disinterest. The thing that interested me the most is when I realized what an expression of death anxiety these rituals, this religion, and this culture is. They worship and follow Osiris so they too can be resurrected, the name Osiris is associated with the deceased so they can invoke him, they apply rigorous embalming so no corpse could be corrupte The Egyptian Book of the Dead is a set of rituals and incantations from an ancient civilization, and that will immediately set anyone’s interest or disinterest. The thing that interested me the most is when I realized what an expression of death anxiety these rituals, this religion, and this culture is. They worship and follow Osiris so they too can be resurrected, the name Osiris is associated with the deceased so they can invoke him, they apply rigorous embalming so no corpse could be corrupted with worms and decay further, there are incantations for deifying each body part to invoke immortality into them, there are reincarnation cycles. There is this incredible obsession over preservation and immortality that I can’t help but read into it this terrible existential cry of mortality. When I read a passage like, “I shall not decay, I shall not rot, I shall not putrefy, I shall not turn into worms, and I shall not see corruption before the eye of the god Shu. I shall live, I shall live; I shall flourish, I shall flourish, I shall flourish, I shall wake up in peace” (CLIV 17-18), it reads desperate and fearful to me. Death anxiety is the foundation for many afterlife beliefs, but none of them go quite this far in the deep about it, and that’s what I found so compelling here. Everyone knows the pyramids, but after reading this I now see them as massive monuments screaming “don’t let me die, let me live on forever,” and yet as the famous poem goes, nothing beside remains. Beyond that, there are some real interesting figures of speech put into it (a lot of cool metaphors about the sun and the sky), and you can see tiny seeds that would later spread, such as exhortations reminiscent of the Biblical Hebrew poetry (the phrase “go in peace” makes a cameo), and a handful of passages that you might find echoing in the trips to Hades in Homer and Vergil. To be sure, I wouldn’t put this as compulsory reading, the most you would get out of this is feeding a curiosity that you may or may not have. But it’s not a big investment either, the original hieroglyphics are typically included which makes the page counts bigger than the actual work is. I’d recommend it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    I bought this at the Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum in San Jose, CA because I've been fascinated for a long time with Egyptian rituals, particularly as they concern the ancients' views on the afterlife. The Egyptians believed that they could guide a soul to the afterlife by burying them with a copy of this book, which contained instructions and charms, spells, keys and other helps that the dead person was supposed to use along the path towards resurrection. Beautiful full-color hieroglyphic images I bought this at the Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum in San Jose, CA because I've been fascinated for a long time with Egyptian rituals, particularly as they concern the ancients' views on the afterlife. The Egyptians believed that they could guide a soul to the afterlife by burying them with a copy of this book, which contained instructions and charms, spells, keys and other helps that the dead person was supposed to use along the path towards resurrection. Beautiful full-color hieroglyphic images made from the original and complete papyrus of Ani found in 1888 accompany English translations of the text. Fascinating.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    This translation of the Egyptian Book of the Dead has a lot of great illustrations, which, for an amateur art history buff, are gravy. Unfortunately, the scholarly value of this edition isn’t so great. Seleem seems to have embraced Egyptian religion wholeheartedly, and spends most of the commentary pointing out how advanced the Egyptians were and how their spirituality is superior to Judeo-Christian and Islamic traditions. (He also seems to think that said traditions come from Egyptian ideas.) H This translation of the Egyptian Book of the Dead has a lot of great illustrations, which, for an amateur art history buff, are gravy. Unfortunately, the scholarly value of this edition isn’t so great. Seleem seems to have embraced Egyptian religion wholeheartedly, and spends most of the commentary pointing out how advanced the Egyptians were and how their spirituality is superior to Judeo-Christian and Islamic traditions. (He also seems to think that said traditions come from Egyptian ideas.) He also made a lot of references to mistranslations which he, in his magnanimity, has corrected; for example, the word that has been typically translated as “god” really means “law”. According to him, the Egyptians were monotheistic; the various “gods” were really “laws”, aspects of the natural order. (I feel obliged to point out that the Greeks were also monotheistic in this sense, as they too believed in a single, impersonal deity, which was above and beyond the shenanigans and goings-on on Mount Olympus.) The Book of the Dead, which Seleem says should be translated as the Book of Coming Forth by Day, is a guide to the afterlife. It was typically buried with the dead to provide them a sort of map through Purgatory (which they called “the Dwat”) to Heaven, where they were either reincarnated or permitted to go to the Elysian fields. Seleem points out that this idea of reincarnation appeared in the Hindu religion as well, and, he thinks, was borrowed from Egyptian spirituality, since the soul is reincarnated if it hasn’t been sufficiently righteous. Among his other irrelevant New Age-y asides, Seleem specifically repudiates Christianity, stating that the Egyptian religion is superior because salvation is by an individual’s acts, not by Christ. In addition, he remarks at one point, “Christ was crucified by those who later glorified him.” Such statements hardly increase one’s confidence in the accuracy of the translation. If you’re looking for a shallow overview of the Book of the Dead with some awesome pictures, this is a good edition. But if you’re looking for a scholarly treatment of the subject, which I was, you’d better look elsewhere.

  13. 5 out of 5

    George Mills

    The true title of this work should be, "The Book of Coming Forth by Day." It's purpose was to provide the dead pharaoh with the knowledge necessary to navigate the world of the dead so that he may be able to take his place on the great solar barge. It should be pointed out that this set of instructions was drawn up for an individual and there can be great discrepancies between it and books prepared for other individuals. This translation was intended for Egyptologists. It is not for people who a The true title of this work should be, "The Book of Coming Forth by Day." It's purpose was to provide the dead pharaoh with the knowledge necessary to navigate the world of the dead so that he may be able to take his place on the great solar barge. It should be pointed out that this set of instructions was drawn up for an individual and there can be great discrepancies between it and books prepared for other individuals. This translation was intended for Egyptologists. It is not for people who are simply interested in Egypt and Egyptian Myth and Religion. Indeed, the book only makes sense if one is quite familiar with Egyptian Myths, Religions, and Philosophies. Here, one must remember that Egyptian Society lasted for over 3,000 years. Although the shell and form of religions were maintained, each age had its own definition of the mythology and that the influence of individual gods waxed and waned during Egyptian history. As a footnote: This translation has also fallen out of favor with modern Egyptologists because (among other things) his translations are not sufficiently specific to the time period of this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Devlin Scott

    The first part of this book is a very interesting history lesson. It explains in part a brief history of the Egyptian Gods and their role in the afterlife. The second part of the book is a listing of the prayers and supplications for the afterlife. Imagine the journey into the afterlife as an oral test...this book has all the answers. You need only recite them to the proper god and move forward to the next...however...you must still have your heart weighed by Osiris at the end of your journey. It The first part of this book is a very interesting history lesson. It explains in part a brief history of the Egyptian Gods and their role in the afterlife. The second part of the book is a listing of the prayers and supplications for the afterlife. Imagine the journey into the afterlife as an oral test...this book has all the answers. You need only recite them to the proper god and move forward to the next...however...you must still have your heart weighed by Osiris at the end of your journey. It is a very interesting book and worth reading if you like ancient history. How faithful a translation this book is, I don't know. Devlin

  15. 4 out of 5

    Max

    This book provides some informations about Egyptian Mithology and the role of the Dead in ancient Egypt colture. It is really not very entertaiment, infact sometimes is pretty boring. I'd like to read Egyptian Mithology in a different style. It is basically a summary of the book of dead but the original text is missing. I give it 3 stars, more 2.5 for me, cause there were a lot of informations that I didnt know.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Another read for university.

  17. 4 out of 5

    kislam

    It is a shame that it can be so hard to find translations of the Book of Going Forth By Day by anyone other than Budge. I was especially disappointed to find a lack of any such ebooks, although the Budge translation abounds (and I do own a copy on my Kindle, mostly for completeness with my Budge library). However, Budge's translation is known not to be the most accurate translation out there. Enter Faulkner's translation. Gorgeously illustrated with portions of several papyri from the British Mus It is a shame that it can be so hard to find translations of the Book of Going Forth By Day by anyone other than Budge. I was especially disappointed to find a lack of any such ebooks, although the Budge translation abounds (and I do own a copy on my Kindle, mostly for completeness with my Budge library). However, Budge's translation is known not to be the most accurate translation out there. Enter Faulkner's translation. Gorgeously illustrated with portions of several papyri from the British Museum collection, including examples in both hieroglyphics and hieratics, with an excellent introduction and notes of historical interest in the development of the book from the earliest onset of the cult of Osiris (and before, touching on the Pyramid Texts). The book arranges the spells mostly in order, however, the crucial spell 30B (the judgement of the dead) is listed first, followed by spell 125, a declaration of innocence. For anyone interested in classical history, this book is definitely a welcome addition.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Adrian Colesberry

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Once you catch onto the plot, the story is kind of fun and funny. Basically, when you die, you go through a series of obstacles to get to the afterworld. Humans are not allowed in. So you have to trick your way in by disguising yourself as Osiris. All these different snakes and whatnot see that you're Osiris so they let you by. The minor detail that hundreds if not thousands of people are trying to use the same trick to get by all these obstacles makes you wonder how stupid the guardians of the Once you catch onto the plot, the story is kind of fun and funny. Basically, when you die, you go through a series of obstacles to get to the afterworld. Humans are not allowed in. So you have to trick your way in by disguising yourself as Osiris. All these different snakes and whatnot see that you're Osiris so they let you by. The minor detail that hundreds if not thousands of people are trying to use the same trick to get by all these obstacles makes you wonder how stupid the guardians of the afterworld are? No one wonders, "Wait, didn't Osiris just go by five minutes ago?"

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    So I don't actually write reviews for books on this site, but I figure some explanation is needed here: it would seem exceptionally silly to give a star rating to something that some Egyptians wrote a few thousand years ago, or to pretend I'm some sort of expert who can judge this particular translation over later ones. So instead, simply take the "four star" rating as meaning I humbly found The Egyptian Book of the Dead an enjoyable and educational read as a lay person.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    A beautiful reproduction of the Book of the Dead taken from tomb walls and papyri sources to give the reader the full script, in all it's colourful glory. The photographs are supported by Budge's text which explains each of the scenes in turn, including their importance to the Egyptian religion.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    should be required reading, with footnotes and much Egyptian literary history. Beautiful book of death and life.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gloria monaghan

    hard to red- my eyes are going. Text is also ancient and you need to follow like a math problem. Still I will devote my time.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Jones

    I liked that this book gave more of a general explanation of the different chapters of the Book of the Dead. I would certainly like to see the wording of the original text, but that's not the most exciting reading if that's all that's offered by the book. Also their description helps when you read old world wording in that you don't have to go back over the sentences to make sure you got it when you read it. This would be a great book for anyone taking a class studying the Book of the Dead! Very I liked that this book gave more of a general explanation of the different chapters of the Book of the Dead. I would certainly like to see the wording of the original text, but that's not the most exciting reading if that's all that's offered by the book. Also their description helps when you read old world wording in that you don't have to go back over the sentences to make sure you got it when you read it. This would be a great book for anyone taking a class studying the Book of the Dead! Very interesting process to get to their Heaven. You gotta remember a lot of phrases and names and have a lot of tests to get through before you become an immortal farmer in their Heaven.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Shanna

    Okay, this was an amazing read. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it, an it made everything so much clearer about how the Ancient Egyptians viewed death and the afterlife. I highly recommend this as a read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Paige Etheridge

    This religion is as alive in out culture today as it ever was. The form simply changed.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Daniela

    FINALLY!! I FINISHED!!! I feel like I've come forth by day and night and month after reading this. I'm only giving it two stars because of the deep love I hold towards ancient Egyptian culture and myth because this book is unbearable. If you are not somewhat familiar with the myths don't even bother, find a more recent translation because this may be the classic version but it's horribly bad. The language tries to be poetic and archaic just because and instead of adding to the beauty of these pr FINALLY!! I FINISHED!!! I feel like I've come forth by day and night and month after reading this. I'm only giving it two stars because of the deep love I hold towards ancient Egyptian culture and myth because this book is unbearable. If you are not somewhat familiar with the myths don't even bother, find a more recent translation because this may be the classic version but it's horribly bad. The language tries to be poetic and archaic just because and instead of adding to the beauty of these prayers it makes them confusing. Every parenthesis, every bracket and every quotation mark only helps making the read more and more annoying and confusing as you go. Not to mention the names of the deities are mostly wrong and you can find the same god called two different names accross the book (yeah, I'm kind of a nerd for Egyptian myth, so I notice that shit...) I'll just get the short, prayer-only version (and a more modern translation, at that) because this was dense as fuck (if you'll pardon my French).

  27. 4 out of 5

    Oceana2602

    Yeah, okay, so I never read this. I bought in 1995 in New Zealand, in a small, rather esoteric shop in Dunedin right off of George Street, if I remember correctly. 14 years later, I can admit that buying it had more to do with my then-dilusion of becoming an Egyptologist and not the lawyer that everyone told me I'd become (and how right they were. *sigh*). Also, it seemed kinda cool. Years later, however, owning this book become a whole different meaning for me, when I fell in love with Stargate, Yeah, okay, so I never read this. I bought in 1995 in New Zealand, in a small, rather esoteric shop in Dunedin right off of George Street, if I remember correctly. 14 years later, I can admit that buying it had more to do with my then-dilusion of becoming an Egyptologist and not the lawyer that everyone told me I'd become (and how right they were. *sigh*). Also, it seemed kinda cool. Years later, however, owning this book become a whole different meaning for me, when I fell in love with Stargate, and Daniel, as everyone SG-1 fan knows, thinks that Budge is an idiot. "Budge?", I went the first time I heard this. "I own Budge." And it made my fannish little heart happy.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lizy

    This book is a useless lie. It claims to be the book of the dead but it's just someone going on and on about what's inside of the book of the dead onstesd of actually being the book of the dead. It'd be like a book going "yes I am a Bible I am definitely a Bible this is a Bible" and when you open it instead of getting "In the beginning God created the heavens and the Earth," you get "Genesis is about the creation of the Earth and the legacy of Abraham," and not actually using any Biblical quotes This book is a useless lie. It claims to be the book of the dead but it's just someone going on and on about what's inside of the book of the dead onstesd of actually being the book of the dead. It'd be like a book going "yes I am a Bible I am definitely a Bible this is a Bible" and when you open it instead of getting "In the beginning God created the heavens and the Earth," you get "Genesis is about the creation of the Earth and the legacy of Abraham," and not actually using any Biblical quotes until like 80% of the way through the book. Don't waste your time.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra Kay Silva

    I read this in conjunction with the Tibetean book of the dead as kind of a personal study of some of the more ancient ideas about the afterlife. I actually ended up having to consult my book on egyptian mythology very frequently to follow all of the references to various deities in it. Which, was an entirely worthwhile enterprize but should be noted that to fully enjoy this work one may wish to have something like that handy.

  30. 4 out of 5

    i_hate_books

    The author spends more time than I care for on defending ancient Egyptian religion against an imaginary reader who can only comprehend contemporary faiths. But the book was very informative for my projects, contains translations of "chapters" missing from the papyrus this book focuses on, and offers a commentary section for more in-depth discussion.

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