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Dracula and Other Horror Stories

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Dracula and Other Horror Classics collects the most memorable tales of horror by Bram Stoker. In addition to Dracula--the landmark vampire novel that set the pattern for virtually all vampire fiction written after its publication in 1897--this omnibus collects the novels The Jewel of Seven Stars and The Lair of the White Worm. In also includes a dozen of Stoker's short tal Dracula and Other Horror Classics collects the most memorable tales of horror by Bram Stoker. In addition to Dracula--the landmark vampire novel that set the pattern for virtually all vampire fiction written after its publication in 1897--this omnibus collects the novels The Jewel of Seven Stars and The Lair of the White Worm. In also includes a dozen of Stoker's short tales of the macabre, including "Dracula's Guest," a sidebar to his famous novel. For more than a century, Bram Stoker's fiction has inspired countless writers of horror and fantasy fiction. This volume allows readers a unique opportunity to appreciate the full range of his dark imagination. Dracua and Other Horror Classics is one of Barnes & Noble's leatherbound classic editions. Each volume features authoritative texts by the world's greatest authors, in exquisitely designed bonded-leather bindings with distinctive gilt edging and an attractive silk-ribbon bookmark. Decorative, durable, and collectible, these books offer hours of pleasure to readers young and old and are an indispensible cornerstone for every home library.


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Dracula and Other Horror Classics collects the most memorable tales of horror by Bram Stoker. In addition to Dracula--the landmark vampire novel that set the pattern for virtually all vampire fiction written after its publication in 1897--this omnibus collects the novels The Jewel of Seven Stars and The Lair of the White Worm. In also includes a dozen of Stoker's short tal Dracula and Other Horror Classics collects the most memorable tales of horror by Bram Stoker. In addition to Dracula--the landmark vampire novel that set the pattern for virtually all vampire fiction written after its publication in 1897--this omnibus collects the novels The Jewel of Seven Stars and The Lair of the White Worm. In also includes a dozen of Stoker's short tales of the macabre, including "Dracula's Guest," a sidebar to his famous novel. For more than a century, Bram Stoker's fiction has inspired countless writers of horror and fantasy fiction. This volume allows readers a unique opportunity to appreciate the full range of his dark imagination. Dracua and Other Horror Classics is one of Barnes & Noble's leatherbound classic editions. Each volume features authoritative texts by the world's greatest authors, in exquisitely designed bonded-leather bindings with distinctive gilt edging and an attractive silk-ribbon bookmark. Decorative, durable, and collectible, these books offer hours of pleasure to readers young and old and are an indispensible cornerstone for every home library.

30 review for Dracula and Other Horror Stories

  1. 4 out of 5

    J Beckett

    I attempted to tackle this book when I was a curious and rambunctious 10 year old. The story was legendary, but I wasn't made aware that the language would drain my blood with as much fervor as the principal character. Frustrated, I tossed the booked aside. Several years later, in an AP English class, it became a required read and, surprisingly, I was lost in the magnificence, the majestic coolness, the imagery, the darkness of every word on every page. It chilled me; left me looking over my sho I attempted to tackle this book when I was a curious and rambunctious 10 year old. The story was legendary, but I wasn't made aware that the language would drain my blood with as much fervor as the principal character. Frustrated, I tossed the booked aside. Several years later, in an AP English class, it became a required read and, surprisingly, I was lost in the magnificence, the majestic coolness, the imagery, the darkness of every word on every page. It chilled me; left me looking over my shoulder as I walked home many late evenings. My senses keened as every quiet indecipherable human form approaching me, became Dracula. Since those early days, I have read Bram Stoker's Dracula nearly a dozen times, as well as taught it's eerie details to high school students who were convinced that vampires didn't exist before Vampire Diaries. This book defines classic literary phenomenon, in every sense. Dracula, as a novel, was written in a tradition long lost; a full story that draws the reader deep into its narrative. You know the story... now read the book again for the very first time.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Es lebe der subtile Grusel. Dracula ist nicht umsonst der Klassiker unter den Vampirromanen. Hier ist noch nichts grob, plump, deftig oder vulgär. Genau so wie jemand, der immer scharfes Chilli isst, dem zarten Geschmack von Spargel vielleicht nichts mehr abgewinnen kann, kann eventuell ein Konsument der heutigen Thriller mit all ihrer Derbheit mit Dracula nichts anfangen - was nicht schlimm ist. Man sollte sich nur dessen bewusst sein, dass Klassiker sich einer anderen Sprachen bedienen. Insofe Es lebe der subtile Grusel. Dracula ist nicht umsonst der Klassiker unter den Vampirromanen. Hier ist noch nichts grob, plump, deftig oder vulgär. Genau so wie jemand, der immer scharfes Chilli isst, dem zarten Geschmack von Spargel vielleicht nichts mehr abgewinnen kann, kann eventuell ein Konsument der heutigen Thriller mit all ihrer Derbheit mit Dracula nichts anfangen - was nicht schlimm ist. Man sollte sich nur dessen bewusst sein, dass Klassiker sich einer anderen Sprachen bedienen. Insofern sind sie eine sprachliche Zeitreise. Sie wussten damals genau so viele zu begeistern wie unsere Literatur heute. Gerade bei Dracula ist es mir wieder aufgefallen, dass dies ein Roman ist, der geschrieben wurde um zu unterhalten. Und unterhalten hat er mich ausgezeichnet.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shannon S.

    In some ways, the novel resembles little more than an epistolary Victorian sex fantasy. Fans of "Twilight" will hate this book; that quality alone would sway my opinion in its favor. You could write off Dracula as a simple horror novel or attempt to compare Stoker's vision with other vampire novels. That would not be veracious to this novel, nor would it be accurate. Stoker's was the first popular novel of the vampire genre, and remains arguably one of the best. (Polidori's The Vampyre--a portrayal o In some ways, the novel resembles little more than an epistolary Victorian sex fantasy. Fans of "Twilight" will hate this book; that quality alone would sway my opinion in its favor. You could write off Dracula as a simple horror novel or attempt to compare Stoker's vision with other vampire novels. That would not be veracious to this novel, nor would it be accurate. Stoker's was the first popular novel of the vampire genre, and remains arguably one of the best. (Polidori's The Vampyre--a portrayal of the destructive genius of Byron--was the first.) Stoker has managed to produce a novel that is simultaneously a masterful study of High Victorian morals and strictures; a horror novel in which good does not ultimately triumph; flawed protagonists and an utterly alluring evil. This Dracula does not invite empathy, nor is he portrayed as misunderstood. He is simply an ancient evil that will either destroy or be destroyed. Modern readers unfamiliar with the premise may find the Victorian formal language off-putting. However for those of us that grew up with a literary diet laced with large helpings of Shakespeare, Chaucer, Spenser, Byron, and Tennyson Stoker's prose is clear and maintains a pace appropriate for a horror novel. For those of you that cut your teeth on such lesser vampire offerings such as Anne Rice and Laurell K. Hamilton, this book may not be to your taste. Stoker's vampire is not a sexy, well-dressed fop with a penchant for lace ascots and leather pants. There is no doubt that Stoker's Dracula is a fundamental force of evil; yet he is also intelligent, passionate, and cultured. Dracula is not the focus of the novel, but he is the force that propels everything in it. The book is a classic in every way without emphasizing the stuffy, nauseating over-analysis that often accompanies that phrase.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Katharine Willard

    Dracula - I was worried initially that the writing style would be too difficult to grasp, but I was pleasantly surprised that it was rather easy. From what I can remember (I did begin this in April after all) Dracula started off reasonably well-paced. I found I enjoyed the story line with Lucy and her antics better than the subsequent manhunt for Dracula himself which means I didn't enjoy the ending as much as I could have. It was also a bit slower before the climax with Stoker/his characters do Dracula - I was worried initially that the writing style would be too difficult to grasp, but I was pleasantly surprised that it was rather easy. From what I can remember (I did begin this in April after all) Dracula started off reasonably well-paced. I found I enjoyed the story line with Lucy and her antics better than the subsequent manhunt for Dracula himself which means I didn't enjoy the ending as much as I could have. It was also a bit slower before the climax with Stoker/his characters doing a lot of waffling that really wasn't needed. I also found that the characters came to trust too easily and fell in love awfully quick, but maybe that was just part of the times. The Jewel of Seven Stars - This one drew me in straight away with the Egyptian themes throughout as I find the whole mummies and curses ordeal fascinating. Again, I found that the protagonists fell in love way too quick for my tastes but, I went along with it as usual. This, like Dracula, started off well then declined in a lot of unnecessary waffle and then ended with a shock. I'm still in shock now at how this one ended so I would have to say this one might be my favourite out of the three longer tales as it was so unexpected. The Lair of the White Worm - From reading the title to the end of this one, I was terribly confused. First of all, a worm? That's the big threat? And second of all, the plot was kind of all over the place. The love between the main characters seemed to happen instantly and then the death of a character had an absurd reasoning behind it. The only bit I really enjoyed was the climax-type scene towards the end. The shorter tales - The majority of these, funnily enough, I rather enjoyed. They were quick and to the point, drawing me in and then abruptly ending in all sorts of weird ways. The Squaw, The Judge's House and The Burial of the Rats were my favourites out of the bunch with intriguing plots, a strong role for the animals and beautiful imagery. Overall - Even though the writing was quite easy to navigate, it was still obvious that they were all written some time ago as the women were expected to stay out of the drama and the racism in The Lair of the White Worm was shocking!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Susy

    Dracula Me ha gustado mucho la historia de Drácula, es un buen clásico, y que decir de los Personajes como van helsing, como mina, o el loco (quien me daba más miedo que el propio conde)..es una lectura que te mantiene pendiente con los misterios alrededor de esta historia. Los otros cuentos de terror son cortos y terroríficos, muy buenos.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Valerie Miller

    So far, I've only read Dracula, I will update the review when I make it through the rest of the stories. I really enjoyed Dracula, and have forgotten what it's like to have a truly evil vampire as a character.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Scott Southard

    I wil be reviewing this in the future on WKAR's Current State. Stay tuned...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kimani Collins

    i totally love the book, but i love the movie with winona ryder in it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Åsgård

    I'll just paste in all my separate reviews of the stories: Dracula: Full review here: http://www.obscuraundead.com/blog/201... The Jewel Of Seven Stars: As many times as I have read Dracula, I have never read anything else by Bram Stoker! This is a really interesting story. It's very victorian gothic, that has an egyptian supernatural mystery. It's not THAT hard to guess, but still interesting! I thought it ended just as it was getting good, though. I have always been fascinated by Egyptian mythology and history, so I would have li/>The/> I'll just paste in all my separate reviews of the stories: Dracula: Full review here: http://www.obscuraundead.com/blog/201... The Jewel Of Seven Stars: As many times as I have read Dracula, I have never read anything else by Bram Stoker! This is a really interesting story. It's very victorian gothic, that has an egyptian supernatural mystery. It's not THAT hard to guess, but still interesting! I thought it ended just as it was getting good, though. I have always been fascinated by Egyptian mythology and history, so I would have liked to see more! I read that apparently there's an alternate ending that is similar to how Dracula ended, but I think this ending was way better. The Lair Of The White Worm: A young australian man is summoned to England by his granduncle to take over his estate. It starts alright, and then... it just gets weird and bad. It's racist and sexist, even for the time it was written in. The plot is super weird and random (what was the deal with the kite and all that?), pretty hard to get into, boring and just not scary. There are a lot of monologues which is pretty tiring to read. I read the original version, so FORTY chapters - but only 150 pages though. Luckily the short chapters really helped me get through it. I can't believe this was written by Bram Stoker - but at the same time I can tell it's written by him. But this was just.. pretty bad. It's not the worst book in the world, but... If you're reading reviews to decide if you're going to read it or not, just don't. Dracula's Guest And Other Stories Dracula's Guest: A (very) short story. I'm not sure if this was supposed to be the first chapter of Dracula, or something? The main character COULD be Jonathan Harker, but we don't know. It feels very similar to the beginning of Dracula. The Judge's House: A good and pretty creepy story! The Squaw: Full review here: http://carolinesometimes.blogspot.com... The Secret Of Growing Gold: This really reminds me of Poe's Telltale Heart, just not as good! A Gipsy Prophecy: Ok that was kind of hilarious! The Coming Of Abel Behenna: I didn't find this a very interesting story, but it's not bad. The Burial Of The Rats: Didn't find this very interesting or scary, really. A Dream Of Red Hands: I think this was a nice and short sad but beautiful story. Crooken Sands: It bored me at first, but then it picked up and was pretty creepy! The Crystal Cup: I couldn't really get into it. Might read it again another time. The Chain Of Destiny: Not bad! But not particularly exciting, so wouldn't really recommend it unless you're a HUGE fan of Bram Stoker or literature from around that time. The Dualitists: That was definitely... weird. Bram Stoker was sure a creative horror writer!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Patty Zuiderwijk

    Story: 4/5 Characters: 4/5 Writing: 4/5 Reread: Yes, I have read this book multiple times already so this won't be the last time.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jojo

    Opinião em breve

  12. 4 out of 5

    Elise

    Disclaimer: I only read Dracula from this book, not the other stories. The beginning from Jonathan Harker's perspective was such riveting and exciting reading, but after that it was such a drag. It was such a struggle to finish. I did kind of like how all the characters teamed up together in the end to defeat Dracula.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    Dracula: 4/5 I really enjoyed the way this story was written. The separate notes and diary entries gave life to the characters in a way that is unique to the rest of Stoker's works. Though the ending was a little too convenient for my taste, the journey of all the characters and the way they developed was fascinating. A little wordy, as seems to be characteristic of Stoker, but not so much so that it gets in the way of the story. Jewel of the Seven Stars: 3/5 I wanted so bad Dracula: 4/5 I really enjoyed the way this story was written. The separate notes and diary entries gave life to the characters in a way that is unique to the rest of Stoker's works. Though the ending was a little too convenient for my taste, the journey of all the characters and the way they developed was fascinating. A little wordy, as seems to be characteristic of Stoker, but not so much so that it gets in the way of the story. Jewel of the Seven Stars: 3/5 I wanted so badly to love this story - the resurrection of a powerful Egyptian queen, what's not to love? It opened promisingly, with the supernatural powers hovering on the edge of everyone's perception and striking with just enough force and mystery to build quite the perplexing, horrifying case. But quite suddenly, the power is just gone. Only two attempts to get into the safe, and then abandoned, despite the overt descriptions of the power of the supernatural entity. And, after the father wakes up, the suspense seems to disappear entirely until the final moments in the cave. I wish the relationship between Margaret and Queen Thera had been better developed, as there seemed to be real potential there. The rest of the characters were so bland as to be nearly interchangeable, and I often found myself confusing who was who. Lair of the White Worm: 1/5 The story telling left quite a lot to be desired. There were too many awkward transitions between storylines, all of which seemed to focus on the blandest aspects of each character's part. Somehow, even the most action-packed parts - the battles between wills, the fights with Lary Arabella, the final storm - were dulled with an overabundance of telling, not showing. Stoker must have been paid by the line or by the word, for he spent far too much space *explaining* what was happening, which got in the way of the flow of the story, let alone the suspense of the horror. Not to mention the overt racism, and of course sexism, that peppers Stoker's work, but was especially emphasized in this tale. Oolanga's sole purpose seemed to be as contrast to Lady Arabella's supposed "superiority of class and race"and the way he was described was frankly more horrifying than the rest of the story. Short Stories: 1/5 Though technically different, I felt like I was reading the same stories over and over again. Similar buildup, similar fantastic/superstitious threat, and two possible endings: either the "hero" was victorious/saved, or the antihero triumphed with the killing of the "hero."

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

    (This rating is for ‘Dracula’ only, as I have not yet read the other stories in this book.) “Welcome to my house. Come freely. Go safely; and leave something of the happiness you bring.” A story of a vampire, Dracula, who travels from Transylvania to London so that he may have at his disposal an ample supply of fresh blood; and of a group of people who discover his existence and determine to hunt him down. My previous ideas of Dracula were wiped clean as I began this book and he revealed himself (This rating is for ‘Dracula’ only, as I have not yet read the other stories in this book.) “Welcome to my house. Come freely. Go safely; and leave something of the happiness you bring.” A story of a vampire, Dracula, who travels from Transylvania to London so that he may have at his disposal an ample supply of fresh blood; and of a group of people who discover his existence and determine to hunt him down. My previous ideas of Dracula were wiped clean as I began this book and he revealed himself not to be a cheesy caricature resembling a cheap magician but a shadowy object of pure evil. I was slightly worried that it would be boring or difficult to read because of the time and language in which it was written, but it was a delightfully easy and intoxicating read! The story is written not from one person’s POV, but with the combination of newspaper articles, journal entries, and ship logs. The 19th century language and sophistication and the evil and horror of Dracula paired interestingly well and made for a very remarkable story! It was a bit more dark than I expected for a book of its time, and I found myself sucked into the story as strongly as Dracula sucked the life from his victims.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Josef Kutilek

    One of the greatest books I've ever read. I remember being very surprised as a young boy, expecting it to be very dry and melodramatic. However, I was sucked in from start to finish. The format of journals, diaries, and newspaper clippings made it seem all the more real. It was like I was reading something that truly happened to these people. Dracula was suddenly no longer a cartoon character in my mind but a genuine threat. Highly recommended.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carlos

    Book had a very strong beginning and middle, but I got more disinterested the farther into it I read. Also the ending was completely anti-climactic. Best character by far was Renfield.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Hammett

    scary in places

  18. 4 out of 5

    Vicky

    like 3.5??? idk

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alpa

    a little dated, and some odd plot holes, but still good!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    I enjoyed the way the book was put together through journals, news clippings, and phonograph diary. I think the ending of this book is kind of weak, but overall a good story.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andreas

    Dracula: 2/5 Dracula has its strengths in the smaller stories it tells, like the story about the madman who catches flies, then spiders, then birds, and when he doesn't get a cat, eats the birds. Another story I liked a lot was the one about a captain and the mysterious disappearance of his crew till only he remains as a paranoid, broken man who is determined to reach port. Both of these are excellent examples of how to build dread and are legitimately eerie. The problems come in the main s Dracula: 2/5 Dracula has its strengths in the smaller stories it tells, like the story about the madman who catches flies, then spiders, then birds, and when he doesn't get a cat, eats the birds. Another story I liked a lot was the one about a captain and the mysterious disappearance of his crew till only he remains as a paranoid, broken man who is determined to reach port. Both of these are excellent examples of how to build dread and are legitimately eerie. The problems come in the main story, as it is a compilation of different diaries, articles, letters, and so on, I expected the writing-styles to be different enough to notice the difference without having to look at the names above the chapters. It isn't. Another thing I have to point out is that Lucy and Mina constantly brag about how honorable and wonderful all men are, which only made me wonder if Stoker has ever actually talked to a woman. While that's uncertain, it's clear that Stoker's biggest weakness is writing characters. The best way to describe them would be, "Unevenly carved bread," as there are differences, but not enough to notice it unless you pay close attention. The Jewel of Seven Stars: 1/5 How do you make an ancient mummy-witch taking possession of someone's life bad? To put it simply, all the characters have one trait, if you stretch the meaning of trait to "they all have a different job." Combine this with a plot buildup that's so generic that a sitcom would roll its eyes and utter boredom throughout. When a gun is fired into a room it shouldn't be more tempting to put the book down and write a paper on the aerodynamic capabilities of a brick than continue reading. The Lair of the White Worm: 1/5 This is the exact same as The Jewel of Seven Stars with one notable exception: Explicit racism of the early 20th century, where Stoker talks about the beauty of a Caucasian, white, blonde before saying that her beauty is only elevated by standing next to people of a darker skin colour, which he compares to ugly animals. I paraphrase, as I am not comfortable quoting what he actually wrote, so maybe it's for the best that Stoker's just remembered for Dracula. Short Stories: 1/5 I find the two stories I talked about in the beginning to be the best parts of Dracula, which made me a little excited for the short stories, but alas the stories he told in Dracula were the only good ones. I never found myself as much as unnerved. The previous problems come up, but there's nothing good in them. Conclusion: Dracula is a work for those who are interested in the evolution of vampires, horror, and those who like literature from the 19th-20th century. The rest is a jumble that just illustrated how Dracula was lightning in a bottle. If you like Dracula and want to see what else Bram Stoker wrote, I can recommend it, but I doubt you'll find anything you'll like. I might be wrong, though.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chris Orme

    31/130 (2019 Reading Challenge) Firstly this is not one book it is 4. Dracula, The jewel of the 7 stars, the lair of the white worm & Dracula’s guest and other stories. Dracula definitely gets 5stars, it was enjoyable to read & compelling right to the very end. I’d tried to read it when younger & could not get on with it but now really enjoyed it. A defining piece of horror fiction & a definite classic. The Jewel of the seven stars, I would give 5 stars as w 31/130 (2019 Reading Challenge) Firstly this is not one book it is 4. Dracula, The jewel of the 7 stars, the lair of the white worm & Dracula’s guest and other stories. Dracula definitely gets 5stars, it was enjoyable to read & compelling right to the very end. I’d tried to read it when younger & could not get on with it but now really enjoyed it. A defining piece of horror fiction & a definite classic. The Jewel of the seven stars, I would give 5 stars as well. Not the classic Dracula is but still found it really compelling & enjoyable to read. The original ending as well! The Lair of the white worm is where the writing is let down. It started off fairly intriguing but got boring, nonsensical & horribly racist to boot. This will always be a problem with older work & is never nice but is a reflection of the time & books capture that. It’s horrible & depressing to see how the world was but as it can’t be undone it can be learned from. Racism is abhorrent & horrible & the fact that the book got published at all tells you what you need to know about past views. I’m not going to get into a big thing here but this book has some really bad lines in it & was sad to see after the first two books as despite being obviously outdated in some ways never went down that path. & it was a dire book story wise, no value at all. Thankfully the final short story collection means the book does not end with this & there are some great stories here. Dracula’s guest, the burial of rats, the squaw, the coming of Abel behenna & crooken sands were my favourite. So a mixed bag. The book itself is lovely, leather bound & a joy to behold & read. If you want to delve into Bram Stoker’s work it’s a great choice for what it contains. It’s a shame one of them was really shoddy but that’s my opinion. Make your own.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Marius Stubberud

    I found Dracula to be an alright novel, and I can see the influences its had on vampire lore. My praise ends there, though. I'm not sure if it's just how characters were written in those times or if it was just how Bram Stoker wrote them, but to me they were completely void of any humanity. They were all virtually pure plot devices, and painfully theatrical and verbose. And I don't know how many times one of the characters said something along the lines of "let us think about what we've just tal I found Dracula to be an alright novel, and I can see the influences its had on vampire lore. My praise ends there, though. I'm not sure if it's just how characters were written in those times or if it was just how Bram Stoker wrote them, but to me they were completely void of any humanity. They were all virtually pure plot devices, and painfully theatrical and verbose. And I don't know how many times one of the characters said something along the lines of "let us think about what we've just talked about, and discuss it more some later time" right at the end of the chapter, making it too obvious that this is where Bram stoker felt the chapter was done, so he needed a convenient way to end this chapter and start the next. While the plot in Dracula was decent, the plot in The Jewel of Seven Stars was less so, and the plot in The Lair of the White Worm was downright appalling and not a little bit racist. Overall reading this collection was somewhat of a miserable experience. I've read books of this size in a week, but this one took me 3 months to get through, so I just cannot recommend this book at all.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rosie Vince

    Really enjoyed Dracula, the characters are great the atmosphere very creepy, i enjoyed the writting style did not realize that it was written in the form of letters and journal entry's but it worked well.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Javier Alvarez

    It starts really interesting, I wasn't aware that the narrative format of the book was like this, however, right after the middle of the book it starts to become repetitive and boring, luckily it picks up again by the end. My only complaint is that mid part of the book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    Finished reading "Dracula" will get round to reading the other stories soon!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nizan Sanders

    It was good. The jumping around to different character's stories was a little tiresome. I lost the mood to read it after a while.

  28. 4 out of 5

    John Day

    Stoker does a good job of making his vampire character's story sound real with his use of Epistolary formatting, historical research of Vlad Tepes Dracula ,(as of last year his great grand nephew has found evidence to support that Bram knew who Vlad Tepes was), local Transylvanian superstitions and real geographic story placing. The book probably drew the most scares possible out of it's Victorian English audience and still has a lot power over its modern one. It may not be perfect but I think B Stoker does a good job of making his vampire character's story sound real with his use of Epistolary formatting, historical research of Vlad Tepes Dracula ,(as of last year his great grand nephew has found evidence to support that Bram knew who Vlad Tepes was), local Transylvanian superstitions and real geographic story placing. The book probably drew the most scares possible out of it's Victorian English audience and still has a lot power over its modern one. It may not be perfect but I think Bram tried HARD to make it good and it shows. I haven't read the other stories yet.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jana

    Dracula is a phenomenal work of ficiton, and I also highly enjoyed the rest of the stories printed in this book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Elena Testino

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