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The French Market Cookbook: Vegetarian Recipes from My Parisian Kitchen

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Cook from the farmer’s market with inspired vegetarian recipes—many of which are gluten-free and dairy-free—with a French twist, all highlighting seasonal produce.   Beloved ChocolateAndZucchini.com food blogger Clotilde Dusoulier is not a vegetarian. But she has, like many of us, chosen to eat less meat and fish, and is always looking for new ways to cook what looks best at Cook from the farmer’s market with inspired vegetarian recipes—many of which are gluten-free and dairy-free—with a French twist, all highlighting seasonal produce.   Beloved ChocolateAndZucchini.com food blogger Clotilde Dusoulier is not a vegetarian. But she has, like many of us, chosen to eat less meat and fish, and is always looking for new ways to cook what looks best at the market. In The French Market Cookbook, she takes us through the seasons in 82 recipes—and explores the love story between French cuisine and vegetables.   Choosing what’s ripe and in season means Clotilde does not rely heavily on the cheese, cream, and pastas that often overpopulate vegetarian recipes. Instead she lets the bright flavors of the vegetables shine through: carrots are lightly spiced with star anise and vanilla in a soup made with almond milk; tomatoes are jazzed up by mustard in a gorgeous tart; winter squash stars in golden Corsican turnovers; and luscious peaches bake in a cardamom-scented custard. With 75 color photographs of the tempting dishes and the abundant markets of Paris, and with Clotilde’s charming stories of shopping and cooking in France, The French Market Cookbook is a transportive and beautiful cookbook for food lovers everywhere.


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Cook from the farmer’s market with inspired vegetarian recipes—many of which are gluten-free and dairy-free—with a French twist, all highlighting seasonal produce.   Beloved ChocolateAndZucchini.com food blogger Clotilde Dusoulier is not a vegetarian. But she has, like many of us, chosen to eat less meat and fish, and is always looking for new ways to cook what looks best at Cook from the farmer’s market with inspired vegetarian recipes—many of which are gluten-free and dairy-free—with a French twist, all highlighting seasonal produce.   Beloved ChocolateAndZucchini.com food blogger Clotilde Dusoulier is not a vegetarian. But she has, like many of us, chosen to eat less meat and fish, and is always looking for new ways to cook what looks best at the market. In The French Market Cookbook, she takes us through the seasons in 82 recipes—and explores the love story between French cuisine and vegetables.   Choosing what’s ripe and in season means Clotilde does not rely heavily on the cheese, cream, and pastas that often overpopulate vegetarian recipes. Instead she lets the bright flavors of the vegetables shine through: carrots are lightly spiced with star anise and vanilla in a soup made with almond milk; tomatoes are jazzed up by mustard in a gorgeous tart; winter squash stars in golden Corsican turnovers; and luscious peaches bake in a cardamom-scented custard. With 75 color photographs of the tempting dishes and the abundant markets of Paris, and with Clotilde’s charming stories of shopping and cooking in France, The French Market Cookbook is a transportive and beautiful cookbook for food lovers everywhere.

30 review for The French Market Cookbook: Vegetarian Recipes from My Parisian Kitchen

  1. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    Instructions like "Pop the cardamom pods open with the flat of a chef's knife and grind the seeds finely with a mortar and pestle" ensure that I will never make any of the recipes in this cookbook. Ever.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Blue

    You know how it is when you are at a beautiful winery with electric car charging stations and a water bottle filling station, and a big iced trough full of metal water bottles for guests who didn't bring their own refillable bottles to borrow, and organic wine, and the only thing that would make this better would be wines that you are actually excited by (spoiler alert, despite my lack of enthusiasm for these wines I did in fact drink two glasses at dinner that night, because, well it wasn't bad You know how it is when you are at a beautiful winery with electric car charging stations and a water bottle filling station, and a big iced trough full of metal water bottles for guests who didn't bring their own refillable bottles to borrow, and organic wine, and the only thing that would make this better would be wines that you are actually excited by (spoiler alert, despite my lack of enthusiasm for these wines I did in fact drink two glasses at dinner that night, because, well it wasn't bad wine, and it was a pasta dinner and, you know what - don't judge me for my lack of enthusiasm or contradictory wine consumption) ...wait, what was I saying? Oh yes, lack of enthusiasm for the wine, so I wandered off to the non-alcoholic shopping area and found The French Market Cookbook, which I was enthusiastic about. And after insisting my husband admire the pretty pictures, I decided to buy the book because clearly if I own a book with pretty photos the food I cook will be magically better, even if I never even use the recipes. Because, Duh, magic. Sad to report I have no idea if the book contains magic because in fact I immediatly started using the recipes. Which, if you knew me, is quite the departure from my usual 'This will change everything!!" impulse purchases that tend to languish for weeks or months before I try using whatever wigget I've brough home. What can I say? This book has some beautiful photos... First up in my attempt to make beautiful food was Eggplant And Black Olive Caviar. Official response: Meh. The recipe does get bonus points for the 'just stick the oiled eggplants on a baking sheet - with a couple of slits cut into the side - and bake. (Please do not ask me my previous methods of roasting eggplants...it wasn't pretty, and quite frankly I will deny I was ever so clueless). Negative points for just being bland. I saved the batch by taking the leftovers (ie: 95% of the recipe) the next day and adding tahini and more garlic. My revised batch? I think it might make a nice pasta sauce for some whole wheat linguini. Next up - Goat Cheese and Rosemary Sables. Official response: "I can't talk my mouth is full." I'm making these for a dinner party tomorrow. I had no idea what a sable was, but the picture looked interesting, and I love rosemary so I gave it a go. Think a savory cookie. The only sweetner is a teaspoon of honey, so the word cookie might be misleading. Tomorrow these will be served with the before dinner drinks and maybe some marinated olives. My only disappointment with the recipe was that the sables just didn't brown well, so I may try an egg wash tomorrow. Or not. My ratio of good ideas to try vs good ideas I actually tried is not super high... Last up on the "Mo surprised the universe by using her new cookbook within 24 hours of ownership" hit parade was the Peach, Almond, and Cardomom Clafoutis. Official response: um, ok, honesty time...I didn't actually make this. But I did somehow con my friend of over 40 years into pulling this together as I figured out how to fake chilling the Goat a Cheese and Rosemary Sabels in the freezer for an hour when I only had a quarter of an hour before they had to go in the oven (really cookbook designer? Putting the "place in freezer for one hour" instructions on page two of the recipe isn't really fair). So my lovely friend did all the work on this one (On the one hand, after the first fourty years you'd think she would be on to my conning ways and make me do my own work, but on the other hand, we've been friends for so long an argument can be made that she knows that hanging out with me is likely to involve her coming to my rescue.) I don't know if there were any tricky bits to this recipe - and as I'm also making this for tomorrow's dinner party I'm really hoping there aren't - but I do know it was quite tasty. If you make this dish I recommend the optional creme fraiche as a topping. It balanced the clafoutis nicely. So...two out of the three recipes I tried last weekend I'm making this weekend, which is pretty high praise (well, praise, and a reluctance to try all new recipes on my guests). And I've already got my eye on some beautiful pictures I want to give a try next week.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    From Chocolate & Zucchini Blogger Clotilde Dusoulier, a book of seasonal French vegetarian and vegan recipes and tips for shopping for and creating meals with a veg-friendly focus. The book reads much like her blog--friendly, inspiring and like a little trip to Paris from the couch. ;-) I have tagged many dishes to make like Avocado and Radish Mini Tartines, Crunchy Lentil and Watercress Salad,Poor Man's Bouillabaisse (with peas, new potatoes & poached eggs), Shaved Fennel Salad with Pre From Chocolate & Zucchini Blogger Clotilde Dusoulier, a book of seasonal French vegetarian and vegan recipes and tips for shopping for and creating meals with a veg-friendly focus. The book reads much like her blog--friendly, inspiring and like a little trip to Paris from the couch. ;-) I have tagged many dishes to make like Avocado and Radish Mini Tartines, Crunchy Lentil and Watercress Salad,Poor Man's Bouillabaisse (with peas, new potatoes & poached eggs), Shaved Fennel Salad with Preserved Lemon, Chickpea Galette, Lemon Verbena Syrup, Seaweed Tartare, Apple and Salted Caramel Sauce, Cauliflower Gratin with Turmeric and Hazelnuts, and Lebanese Coffee Dessert Jars. This weekend I tried the Tomato and Tarragon Bread Soup (Panade de Tomate à l’ Estragon) which was fabulous with ripe farm fresh summer tomatoes. Here's a link to the recipe and pictures on my blog: http://kahakaikitchen.blogspot.com/20... French cookbooks featuring vegetarian dishes aren't always easy to find so I have a feeling I will be pulling out this paperback book (with plenty of mouthwatering pictures) often.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Maree

    I love French food, not the creamy sauced meaty kind, but the fresh gardened feel like nature kind. Actually, the kind that's in this book. Ms Clotilde chapters recipes by season, while fronting each with a list of seasonal vegetables and fruits. Love that. The cuisine is light, fresh, new, and French. All doable for the home chef. Perfect.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Lemus

    Wonderful recipe ideas and photos inspired by a more provencial France. My only gripe is that the shortbreads and crusts really seem to work only with butter. I did try one of the crust with the suggested vegan ingredients, but it did not really seem like those were actually tested, just added in as an afterthought to reach the vegan market.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    I love the idea of this cookbook and it is very attractively photographed and designed. Unfortunately, only 1 of the 4 or 5 recipes I tried was excellent (Quiche with mushrooms and chives.) The rest were complicated to prepare without the payout of a great dish. The author seems to do better with more traditional French food than healthy vegetarian weeknight staples.

  7. 4 out of 5

    LemontreeLime

    Simply brilliant. I must own this one soon. This is the kind of cookbook that makes me want to make everything in it. An odd mix of tweaks with veggies that makes me eager to try them. Will have to check out more of Dusoulier's books soon.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Holcomb

    Nice addition to anyone's library that is interested in French cooking and cuisine. Having a French vegetarian book is a breath of fresh air, indeed. Divided into seasons makes it all the more easy to use fresh, seasonal ingredients. Living in the US south, there is a good bit of variation between what is in the market here as opposed to the Provence, but the recipes are adaptable enough to where changes and substitutions can be made with ease. This book will take you on a amazing farm fresh to Nice addition to anyone's library that is interested in French cooking and cuisine. Having a French vegetarian book is a breath of fresh air, indeed. Divided into seasons makes it all the more easy to use fresh, seasonal ingredients. Living in the US south, there is a good bit of variation between what is in the market here as opposed to the Provence, but the recipes are adaptable enough to where changes and substitutions can be made with ease. This book will take you on a amazing farm fresh to table journey via the French kitchen! This is one of my "go to" books, especially in the summer. I probably use this little book more than any of the other books on my shelf. Worth the bucks for sure!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Now I can see why I took this off of my to read list. I got this from the library and I am so glad that I did not spend money on this. Now don't get me wrong it is not a horrible book, it is just not a book for me. There are not as many pictures as I would like in this book, with that being said...there are some recipes (very few) that only require a few ingredients. Most of the recipes require many ingredients some lists as long as the page with the instructions being just as long. This is not Now I can see why I took this off of my to read list. I got this from the library and I am so glad that I did not spend money on this. Now don't get me wrong it is not a horrible book, it is just not a book for me. There are not as many pictures as I would like in this book, with that being said...there are some recipes (very few) that only require a few ingredients. Most of the recipes require many ingredients some lists as long as the page with the instructions being just as long. This is not the type of book that makes me excited to cook or even look at. So sad!!!

  10. 5 out of 5

    S

    Her name is Clotilde - you know this book is legitimately french! Lots to like here, and I made a list of all the ones that I want to make myself... which I will have to skip over and see if they are on her blog ("chocolateandzucchine"), since I did not have time to copy them all down from my borrowed book. Just a few of the highlights, though: ~seaweed tartare! ~chocolate berawecka (I just love the name) ~cauliflower gratin with tumeric and hazelnuts Yum.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mrs.soule

    There were very few recipes for our family in this cookbook, as delicious as everything sounds. The recipes depend on a lot of bread, pastry, and other forms of gluten. We tried one recipe (Corsican Bell Pepper Stew) and had mixed reviews (kids hated it, Mr.Soule loved it, I thought it was good but not great).

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mabel

    Nice breakdown for seasonal cooking which is much needed when vegetables are involved! Clear and concise, good amount of pictures to see what you’re making and little tips as well.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Janice Wright

    So many great recipes that I enjoyed while I was living in Paris, it's a treat to have it handy!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cidney Mayes

    An excellent vegetarian cookbook. I have made 3 recipes from here already! Light on the ever-present pasta dishes, focuses more on seasonal ingredients.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Karyn

    Delicious recipes from a long-time favorite blogger. :-)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lilia

    Excited to try a bunch of these vegetarian French recipes (a rarity in cookbooks) that both my carnivore family and I agree upon!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gabi Driskoll

    Amazing recipes, a must have for for vegetarian dishes!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Barbette

    The recipes in this are not as good as those in Dusoulier's CHOCOLATE AND ZUCCHINI, which continues to be a go-to cookbook for me.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dvdurante

    I love this cookbook.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Beth Lequeuvre

    Beautiful food photography and many tempting vegetarian recipes from the blogger behind chocolateandzucchini.com. The book is broken into 4 sections one for each season. Each season features the types of produce that are naturally ready to be harvested in each season and recipes that revolve around those ingredients. Spring: asparagus, artichokes, beets, carrots, dandelions, fava beans, garlic, green peas, kohlrabi, lettuce, mache, morels, new potatoes, onions, radishes, rhubarb, scallions, sorre Beautiful food photography and many tempting vegetarian recipes from the blogger behind chocolateandzucchini.com. The book is broken into 4 sections one for each season. Each season features the types of produce that are naturally ready to be harvested in each season and recipes that revolve around those ingredients. Spring: asparagus, artichokes, beets, carrots, dandelions, fava beans, garlic, green peas, kohlrabi, lettuce, mache, morels, new potatoes, onions, radishes, rhubarb, scallions, sorrel, spinach, strawberries, swiss chard, turnips, watercress Summer:apricots, artichokes, beets, bell peppers, black currants, blueberries, broccoli, celery, cherries, cucumbers, eggplants, fennel, figs, garlic, green beans, kohlrabi, lettuce, melon, nectarines, onions, peaches, potatoes, raspberries, red currants, rhubarb, shell beans, tomatoes, watermelon, zucchini Fall: apples, beets, blackberries, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery root, chestnuts, endives, fennel, figs, grapefruit, grapes, kiwi, kohlrabi, leeks, lemons, mache, mushrooms, oranges, parsnips, pears, persimmons, plums, potatoes, quince, spinach, swiss chard, turnips, walnuts, winter squash Winter: apples, beets, brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery root, endives, garlic, grapefruit, kiwi, kumquats, leeks, lemons, mache, mushrooms, onions, oranges, parsnips, pears, persimmons, potatoes, salsify, shallots, spinach, tangerines, turnips, walnuts, winter squash

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    I borrowed this delightful cookbook from the library but have added it to my wish list to buy soon. Some recipes may take more effort and time but so far the result and experience have been worth it. I made the ratatouille tian with vegetables I purchased that morning from a farmers market and it was amazing! Some vegetarian cookbooks rely heavily on cheese but thankfully this is not one of them. The book is divided into seasons and there are gorgeous photographs of almost every recipe. The step I borrowed this delightful cookbook from the library but have added it to my wish list to buy soon. Some recipes may take more effort and time but so far the result and experience have been worth it. I made the ratatouille tian with vegetables I purchased that morning from a farmers market and it was amazing! Some vegetarian cookbooks rely heavily on cheese but thankfully this is not one of them. The book is divided into seasons and there are gorgeous photographs of almost every recipe. The steps are detailed and broken down nicely so they are very easy to follow. The introductions to each recipe are charming and not too lengthy. In the back there are indices by recipe and ingredient. Not every food blogger is up to the task of creating a worthy cookbook, let alone a classic like this one.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    A charming cookbook to read! Many of the recipes are not very complicated & while some require more intense preparation, all are within reach of the amateur home cook. Some of the ingredients may be harder to find in the USA, especially in my location in the Midwest, but there are plenty of options with easily obtained ingredients. I especially appreciate the background stories and the "Pantry Gems". For me there was just the right amount of photographs to spark my interest, yet not take up A charming cookbook to read! Many of the recipes are not very complicated & while some require more intense preparation, all are within reach of the amateur home cook. Some of the ingredients may be harder to find in the USA, especially in my location in the Midwest, but there are plenty of options with easily obtained ingredients. I especially appreciate the background stories and the "Pantry Gems". For me there was just the right amount of photographs to spark my interest, yet not take up undue space in the book. I look forward to trying out many of the recipes.

  23. 5 out of 5

    BowbytheBay

    I've found some tasty recipes in here that I like quite a bit. Also, some unusual ones like pickled chard stems. They were really good! I like that it is vegetarian and that it is organized by season. My current favorite cookbook does the same: Mark Bittman's "Kitchen Express." However, what I have also discovered is that a lot of the recipes are pretty bland. I've used the freshest produce etc so that is not the problem. They are just too bland for my taste. So, I am glad I checked this out from I've found some tasty recipes in here that I like quite a bit. Also, some unusual ones like pickled chard stems. They were really good! I like that it is vegetarian and that it is organized by season. My current favorite cookbook does the same: Mark Bittman's "Kitchen Express." However, what I have also discovered is that a lot of the recipes are pretty bland. I've used the freshest produce etc so that is not the problem. They are just too bland for my taste. So, I am glad I checked this out from the library instead of buying it (which I almost did). Yay libraries!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    This cookbook was a nice seasonal approach to cooking vegetarian/vegan recipes from a French background. I will admit that I have never seen a vegetarian French cookbook before, as I always think of French cooking as full of cream, cheese and meat, so this collection of recipes was a bit of a revelation to me. I love that nearly every recipe has a gorgeous photo to with it. I would love to try the Cauliflower Gratin with Turmeric and Hazelnuts, Yogurt Mousse with Raspberries and Lemon Verbena Sy This cookbook was a nice seasonal approach to cooking vegetarian/vegan recipes from a French background. I will admit that I have never seen a vegetarian French cookbook before, as I always think of French cooking as full of cream, cheese and meat, so this collection of recipes was a bit of a revelation to me. I love that nearly every recipe has a gorgeous photo to with it. I would love to try the Cauliflower Gratin with Turmeric and Hazelnuts, Yogurt Mousse with Raspberries and Lemon Verbena Syrup, the Peach, Almond and Cardamon Clafoutis, and several more. 4 stars.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Beautiful food photography combined with stories of French/Parisian food traditions and preparation make this a lovely little cookbook. The recipes range from easy to advanced. Of those I tried some were delicious, others were food fails but each recipe inspired me to grow more in my garden, experiment and savor. What more can you ask for.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    I wanted to love this more than I did. I made a handful of things, some of which were good, but none of which were really good. The vegetable bouillabase was probably the only one I'd make again (it would be great in winter). It's a very pretty book, though, and I'll probably go back to it to try something else eventually!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Uma Murthy

    This book is focused on seasonal vegetable and fruit recipes. The recipes are more ideas and inspiration for several delicious foods rather then directions for a single dish. Highly recommended for anyone wanting to incorporate more fruits and vegetables in their everyday meals.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Liisa

    I like the main idea behind this book, seasonal vegetarian, french inspired food. I've made a number of recipes so far and they've worked quite well. I think some of her instructions could be clearer.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bridget Hughes

    This is a great addition to any vegetarian cook book library, the recipes are fresh and modern with French influence, however the recipes are labor intensive and require some things that may not be in the average pantry.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Morgane

    I love this book. It's basically the slightly fancier version of the kind of food I grew up with: francophone cuisine that DOESN'T focus on meat. Of the recipes I've tried with my mom, they've all been good (like the pear-chestnut tart or the gougères) so really, you can't go wrong here.

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