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The Book Lover's Cookbook

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THE BOOK LOVER’S COOKBOOK Recipes Inspired by Celebrated Works of Literature and the Passages that Feature Them Shaunda Kennedy Wenger and Janet Kay Jensen Wake up to a perfect breakfast with Mrs. Dalby’s Buttermilk Scones, courtesy of James Herriot’s All Things Bright and Beautiful and Ichabod’s Slapjacks, as featured in Washington Irving’s The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. There THE BOOK LOVER’S COOKBOOK Recipes Inspired by Celebrated Works of Literature and the Passages that Feature Them Shaunda Kennedy Wenger and Janet Kay Jensen Wake up to a perfect breakfast with Mrs. Dalby’s Buttermilk Scones, courtesy of James Herriot’s All Things Bright and Beautiful and Ichabod’s Slapjacks, as featured in Washington Irving’s The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. There’s homey comfort food like Connie May's Tomato Pie, created with and inspired by Connie May Fowler (Remembering Blue); Thanksgiving Spinach Casserole (Elizabeth Berg’s Open House); and Amish Chicken and Dumplings (Jodi Picoult's Plain Truth) . . . Sample salads, breads, and such soul-warming soups as Nearly-a-Meal Potato Soup (Terry Kay’s Shadow Song); Mr. Casaubon’s Chicken Noodle Soup (George Eliot’s Middlemarch); and Mrs. Leibowitz’s Lentil-Vegetable Soup (Frank McCourt’s Angela’s Ashes) . . . After relishing appetizers and entrees, there’s a dazzling array of desserts, including Carrot Pudding (Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol); Effie Belle’s Coconut Cake (Olive Ann Burns’s Cold Sassy Tree); and the kids will love C.S. Lewis's Turkish Delight from The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe. Sprinkled throughout with marvelous anecdotes about writers and writing, The Book Lover’s Cookbook is a culinary and literary delight, a browser’s cornucopia of reading pleasure, and a true inspiration in the kitchen. Shaunda Kennedy Wenger enjoys creative cooking and writing children’s stories and articles. She is currently working on a novel. Her work has been published in Babybug, Ladybug, Wonder Years, American Careers, South Valley Living, and Short-Short Stories for Reading Aloud (The Education Center, 2000). She is an active member of the League of Utah Writers and the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. She regards her monthly book club meeting as one life’s essential ingredients. Janet Kay Jensen is published in Healing Ministry journal and The Magic of Stories. She has received numerous awards for essays, poetry, and short stories, including three ByLine Magazine honorable mentions. A speech-language pathologist, she holds degrees from Utah State University and Northwestern University. She is writing a novel, teaches poetry classes to jail inmates, and is a literacy tutor. Married and the mother of three sons, she is a consultant at Utah State University. TASTY RECIPES AND THE BOOKS THAT INSPIRED THEM Jo’s Best Omelette . . . Little Women by Louisa May Alcott No Dieter’s Delight Chicken Neapolitan . . . Thinner by Stephen King Extra-Special Rhubarb Pie . . . The Persian Pickle Club by Sandra Dallas Grand Feast Crab Meat Casserole . . . At Home in Mitford by Jan Karon Persian Cucumber and Yogurt . . . House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III Tamales . . . Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel Bev's No-Fuss Crab Cakes . . . Unnatural Exposure by Patricia Cornwell Macaroni and Cheese . . . The Accidental Tourist by Anne Tyler Veteran Split Pea Soup . . . The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane Alternative Carrot-Raisin-Pineapple Salad . . . Midwives by Chris Bohjalian Summer’s Day Cucumber-Tomato Sandwiches . . . Women in Love by D. H. Lawrence Refreshing Black Cows . . . The Book of Ruth by Jane Hamilton Dump Punch . . . Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen Not Violet, But Blueberry Pie . . . Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl Innocent Sweet Bread . . . The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison Daddy's Rich Chocolate Cake . . . Fatherhood by Bill Cosby . . . and many other delectable dishes for the literary palate! From the Hardcover edition.


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THE BOOK LOVER’S COOKBOOK Recipes Inspired by Celebrated Works of Literature and the Passages that Feature Them Shaunda Kennedy Wenger and Janet Kay Jensen Wake up to a perfect breakfast with Mrs. Dalby’s Buttermilk Scones, courtesy of James Herriot’s All Things Bright and Beautiful and Ichabod’s Slapjacks, as featured in Washington Irving’s The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. There THE BOOK LOVER’S COOKBOOK Recipes Inspired by Celebrated Works of Literature and the Passages that Feature Them Shaunda Kennedy Wenger and Janet Kay Jensen Wake up to a perfect breakfast with Mrs. Dalby’s Buttermilk Scones, courtesy of James Herriot’s All Things Bright and Beautiful and Ichabod’s Slapjacks, as featured in Washington Irving’s The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. There’s homey comfort food like Connie May's Tomato Pie, created with and inspired by Connie May Fowler (Remembering Blue); Thanksgiving Spinach Casserole (Elizabeth Berg’s Open House); and Amish Chicken and Dumplings (Jodi Picoult's Plain Truth) . . . Sample salads, breads, and such soul-warming soups as Nearly-a-Meal Potato Soup (Terry Kay’s Shadow Song); Mr. Casaubon’s Chicken Noodle Soup (George Eliot’s Middlemarch); and Mrs. Leibowitz’s Lentil-Vegetable Soup (Frank McCourt’s Angela’s Ashes) . . . After relishing appetizers and entrees, there’s a dazzling array of desserts, including Carrot Pudding (Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol); Effie Belle’s Coconut Cake (Olive Ann Burns’s Cold Sassy Tree); and the kids will love C.S. Lewis's Turkish Delight from The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe. Sprinkled throughout with marvelous anecdotes about writers and writing, The Book Lover’s Cookbook is a culinary and literary delight, a browser’s cornucopia of reading pleasure, and a true inspiration in the kitchen. Shaunda Kennedy Wenger enjoys creative cooking and writing children’s stories and articles. She is currently working on a novel. Her work has been published in Babybug, Ladybug, Wonder Years, American Careers, South Valley Living, and Short-Short Stories for Reading Aloud (The Education Center, 2000). She is an active member of the League of Utah Writers and the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. She regards her monthly book club meeting as one life’s essential ingredients. Janet Kay Jensen is published in Healing Ministry journal and The Magic of Stories. She has received numerous awards for essays, poetry, and short stories, including three ByLine Magazine honorable mentions. A speech-language pathologist, she holds degrees from Utah State University and Northwestern University. She is writing a novel, teaches poetry classes to jail inmates, and is a literacy tutor. Married and the mother of three sons, she is a consultant at Utah State University. TASTY RECIPES AND THE BOOKS THAT INSPIRED THEM Jo’s Best Omelette . . . Little Women by Louisa May Alcott No Dieter’s Delight Chicken Neapolitan . . . Thinner by Stephen King Extra-Special Rhubarb Pie . . . The Persian Pickle Club by Sandra Dallas Grand Feast Crab Meat Casserole . . . At Home in Mitford by Jan Karon Persian Cucumber and Yogurt . . . House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III Tamales . . . Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel Bev's No-Fuss Crab Cakes . . . Unnatural Exposure by Patricia Cornwell Macaroni and Cheese . . . The Accidental Tourist by Anne Tyler Veteran Split Pea Soup . . . The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane Alternative Carrot-Raisin-Pineapple Salad . . . Midwives by Chris Bohjalian Summer’s Day Cucumber-Tomato Sandwiches . . . Women in Love by D. H. Lawrence Refreshing Black Cows . . . The Book of Ruth by Jane Hamilton Dump Punch . . . Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen Not Violet, But Blueberry Pie . . . Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl Innocent Sweet Bread . . . The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison Daddy's Rich Chocolate Cake . . . Fatherhood by Bill Cosby . . . and many other delectable dishes for the literary palate! From the Hardcover edition.

30 review for The Book Lover's Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Such a clever idea! Uses recipes mentioned in novels and the passages they were taken from. Perfect for a book group event. Favorites: - Pippi Longstocking Muffin Cakes - Fried Green Tomatoes... Dumplings - Like Water for Chocolate Tamales - Cold Mountain Ruby's Potato Salad - Little House on the Prairie Ma's Irish Soda Bread - Jane Eyre Privileged Tart

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah Theilen

    A fun and practical homeschool resource.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Becky Ginther

    This is a fun, clever idea for a book. I like that they included passages from all of the novels that they feature, to really put the recipe into some sort of context. I would say that the majority of these recipes aren't "quick and easy" meals, but if you're looking to put a little more effort into it I think there's some really promising recipes here. After reading through the whole thing, I know I personally have a list of about 10 recipes that I'd like to try. If there is one thing that could This is a fun, clever idea for a book. I like that they included passages from all of the novels that they feature, to really put the recipe into some sort of context. I would say that the majority of these recipes aren't "quick and easy" meals, but if you're looking to put a little more effort into it I think there's some really promising recipes here. After reading through the whole thing, I know I personally have a list of about 10 recipes that I'd like to try. If there is one thing that could make this book better, it would be if they added photographs of at least some of the dishes. I know that can be difficult, especially when you know the photos will probably just be in black and white for a book like this, but I find cookbooks a lot more appealing when they have photos.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lize

    This is a charming idea, and one I wish I'd come up with myself: take food-related quotes from a wide variety of literature (everything from Pippi Longstocking to The Great Gatsby to Ogden Nash poems) and include them with the recipes. It makes for a delightful and nostalgic read, and you almost can't bear to put it down without trying one of the recipes. I decided to attempt "Anne's Anodyne Liniment Cake (Without the Anodyne Liniment) from Anne of Green Gables, which produced a dense old-fashio This is a charming idea, and one I wish I'd come up with myself: take food-related quotes from a wide variety of literature (everything from Pippi Longstocking to The Great Gatsby to Ogden Nash poems) and include them with the recipes. It makes for a delightful and nostalgic read, and you almost can't bear to put it down without trying one of the recipes. I decided to attempt "Anne's Anodyne Liniment Cake (Without the Anodyne Liniment) from Anne of Green Gables, which produced a dense old-fashioned cake like my Great-Grandma used to make, and led to a re-read of Anne of Green Gables itself so that I could place the passage. A recipe for Turkish Delight from The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe brought back memories of trying Turkish Delight as an adult and discovering it was so not what I had pictured in my mind as I read the book. A real pleasure for those who love books, food, or both.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    Any book that combines my two loves of cooking and literature is going to be a winner. I rescued this from a thrift shop this afternoon (for 80¢) and after skimming through it, I can tell it is worth 20 times that price. The research that must have gone into this book to find culinary references boggles my mind. It was sitting on a shelf waiting for me to come along and adopt it. Now to try some recipes.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Doris

    Clever idea, poorly executed. While some of the passages inspiring the recipes and the recipes themselves were appropriately paired, many others were flat-out wrong. Real men certainly don't eat quiche when it's made with a crust based on refrigerator biscuit dough; and when Mrs. Bennet promises the servants a bowl of punch for Lydia's wedding in Pride and Prejudice, she was *not* thinking of frozen grape juice concentrate and 7-Up. And even recipes that were appropriately paired were mostly uni Clever idea, poorly executed. While some of the passages inspiring the recipes and the recipes themselves were appropriately paired, many others were flat-out wrong. Real men certainly don't eat quiche when it's made with a crust based on refrigerator biscuit dough; and when Mrs. Bennet promises the servants a bowl of punch for Lydia's wedding in Pride and Prejudice, she was *not* thinking of frozen grape juice concentrate and 7-Up. And even recipes that were appropriately paired were mostly uninteresting: I can't think of one I'm tempted to try.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emilee

    Anne’s Liniment Cake (without the lineament), Bill Crosby’s Fatherhood Chocolate Cake, Pippi Longstocking’s Orange and Poppyseed Muffins, and more recipes from Harry Potter, Little Women, and The Chronicles of Narnia cram packed between the pages accompanying beautiful passages from best loved classics that bring the magic of cuisine to a reader. The next month I’ll be cooking my way through the best books!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    It could have been a big disappointment; it wasn't. The Book Lover's Cookbook is a book of recipes based on foods described in books. I was surprised at all the books that included foods in the plot. Just about all my favorite books seemed to be here. Recommended. Favorite Quote: All kinds of delicious (sorry) book quotes here, too. Here are a couple: "Reading is the work of the alert mind, is demanding, and under ideal conditions produces finally a sort of ecstasy." E.B. White "Handle them care It could have been a big disappointment; it wasn't. The Book Lover's Cookbook is a book of recipes based on foods described in books. I was surprised at all the books that included foods in the plot. Just about all my favorite books seemed to be here. Recommended. Favorite Quote: All kinds of delicious (sorry) book quotes here, too. Here are a couple: "Reading is the work of the alert mind, is demanding, and under ideal conditions produces finally a sort of ecstasy." E.B. White "Handle them carefully, for words have more power than atom bombs." Pearl S. Hurd "The thing I love about language is that when you do it well, you have the ability as a writer to seduce readers---but sometimes you also have the ability to seduce yourself. The pleasure of the language, the ability to put words together in what strikes you as just the right fashion---I love it." Richard Russo

  9. 5 out of 5

    SmartBitches

    Lightning review at Smart Bitches, Trashy Books The Book Lover’s Cookbook: Recipes Inspired by Celebrated Works of Literature, and the Passages that Inspire Them, is a pretty basic, well-rounded “how to cook basic food” cookbook, livened up by literary quotes. This cookbook didn’t give me any new insights into how food and literature intersect, but it was well organized with good use of quotes. Some of the quotes are from fiction or non-fiction, and some are quotes by authors about food and writin Lightning review at Smart Bitches, Trashy Books The Book Lover’s Cookbook: Recipes Inspired by Celebrated Works of Literature, and the Passages that Inspire Them, is a pretty basic, well-rounded “how to cook basic food” cookbook, livened up by literary quotes. This cookbook didn’t give me any new insights into how food and literature intersect, but it was well organized with good use of quotes. Some of the quotes are from fiction or non-fiction, and some are quotes by authors about food and writing. The recipes seem pretty practical, from “Breakfast” to “Desserts”. There are no pictures (I myself like pictures, but I can live without them). It’s not a vegetarian cookbook but there are a lot of vegetarian choices (vegans are probably out of luck – I noticed a lot of cheese and eggs). For the most part, this is pretty standard Middle American Cooking with a few Asian and Mexican offerings. Frankly, there’s nothing much in this cookbook that I don’t already have in other cookbooks, but it would make a good gift for someone who is just starting their collection. If you know a college student who is studying English Lit, tell them I said hi (English Lit Majors FTW!) and give them this cookbook. Also give them a gift card for pizza, because let’s face it, college students don’t have a lot of time to cook anyway. - Carrie S.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I turn to this cookbook surprisingly often. For, as pleased as I was with this book, which I received as a present, (thanks, Betsy! :) I anticipated it to be more of a novelty book that would be fun to flip through. Maybe I would make one of the recipes, but probably not. And yet, it has become a go-to book for me when I need to look for basic recipes! In fact, the compilers of the book seem to have focused their energy not so much (necessarily) on food famously mentioned in books, but on good re I turn to this cookbook surprisingly often. For, as pleased as I was with this book, which I received as a present, (thanks, Betsy! :) I anticipated it to be more of a novelty book that would be fun to flip through. Maybe I would make one of the recipes, but probably not. And yet, it has become a go-to book for me when I need to look for basic recipes! In fact, the compilers of the book seem to have focused their energy not so much (necessarily) on food famously mentioned in books, but on good recipes that can be loosely related to a handful of books. For instance, take "David Copperfield": in the novel, we read again and again bout Mr. Micawber's special gin punch which he makes with lemons. However, a recipe for gin punch is not included in this book. However, in a nod to "Oliver Twist," there IS a recipe for a "Plentiful" seafood stew ("Plentiful" as in, "Yes, Oliver, you CAN have some more stew; for it is plentiful!). That sort of thing is annoying. However, the thing is I would never make that gin punch even if the recipe was included. It would just be fun to have it, you know? By the way, if you DO want that gin punch recipe, there is a book by Charles Dickens' great-grandson which includes recipes for pub drinks, many of which are featured in Dickens novels. That book will eventually be mentioned in my "currently reading" folder here.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alma

    How many times does a person read an entire cookbook from cover to cover? This year I have read 4 of them this way. This one was a very fun collection of excerpts from books, recipes for foods mentioned in books and quotes about and by authors and reading. Though some of my favorites and seemingly obvious choices of books were missing, I was introduced to new authors and stories that I’ll enjoy in the future. Can’t wait to try “Turkish Delight” from the Narnia Chronicles and “Strawberry Fudge” f How many times does a person read an entire cookbook from cover to cover? This year I have read 4 of them this way. This one was a very fun collection of excerpts from books, recipes for foods mentioned in books and quotes about and by authors and reading. Though some of my favorites and seemingly obvious choices of books were missing, I was introduced to new authors and stories that I’ll enjoy in the future. Can’t wait to try “Turkish Delight” from the Narnia Chronicles and “Strawberry Fudge” from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. This is a great book to just pick up and wander through, taking tastes of things here and there.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    I was looking for more authentic recipes, I guess. For instance, included is a wedding punch from a book set long before the 20th century, and the recipe calls for 7-Up. If I'm going to recreate something from a book, I'd like for it to be as realistic as possible, otherwise, it's just like reading an anachronism in a historical book. It jolts you back to reality. There are some interesting recipes that I wouldn't mind trying, but I felt very few of them stayed true to the books they were connec I was looking for more authentic recipes, I guess. For instance, included is a wedding punch from a book set long before the 20th century, and the recipe calls for 7-Up. If I'm going to recreate something from a book, I'd like for it to be as realistic as possible, otherwise, it's just like reading an anachronism in a historical book. It jolts you back to reality. There are some interesting recipes that I wouldn't mind trying, but I felt very few of them stayed true to the books they were connected to.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    This cookbook is just plain fun with recipes inspired by literature, especially when I come across one by a book I've read. Some are obvious like Fried Green Tomatoes (Fannie Flagg) and some more of a stretch like the recipe for pork roast with cabbage that accompanies a quote from Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn where Huck complains he's hungry and Jim gets out some pork and cabbage among other things. Regardless, the quotes and imaginative pairings make me want to re-read some old favorites, giv This cookbook is just plain fun with recipes inspired by literature, especially when I come across one by a book I've read. Some are obvious like Fried Green Tomatoes (Fannie Flagg) and some more of a stretch like the recipe for pork roast with cabbage that accompanies a quote from Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn where Huck complains he's hungry and Jim gets out some pork and cabbage among other things. Regardless, the quotes and imaginative pairings make me want to re-read some old favorites, give some other books a try and hey, the recipes are inviting too--makes me hungry, like Huck.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    I am usually disappointed to find literature or television influenced cookbooks that use a majority of processed foods, but this cookbook is one of my favorites. It focuses on traditional, homemade recipes *and* convenient food recipes, depending on the setting of the book (ie: classics are more traditional than, per se, moderns). I also love how they add quotes and works of poetry throughout the entire cookbook. Well recommended, and is perfect to give to any Goodreading foodie.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Carole

    This cookbook is a fun book of recipes, also including passages from novels and poems. There were passages from Roald Dahl's James and the Giant Peach, Frank McCourt's Angela's Ashes, Elizabeth Berg's Open House, Jodi Picoult's Plain Truth, and Astrid Lindgren's Pippi Longstocking, just to name a few. I only found about 3 recipes I want to try, but I did enjoy the format and the passages. Photographs would be helpful as I like to see what a completed dish looks like in a cookbook.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I paid little attention to the recipes featured her.Instead, I leafed through the pages pleasantly surprised to see some of my favorite books and authors highlighted. Elizabeth Berg merited several entries, Fried Green Tomatoes, To Kill a Mockingbird, Midwives, and The Persian Pickle Club are examples of notables that caught my eye.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Yaaresse

    Interesting idea, but the execution didn't hold my interest. It felt like someone did a search on Google for "food in literature" and then "recipes with _____ in title or ingredient" and matched them up. After reading a dozen or so of them, it gets pretty dull.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    This is a great book. It has reviews of great books and recipes from those books or that would complement a book discussion of those titles. I did a book discussion of this cookbook at my library and we had a blast sharing books and recipes.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    a fun book for those of us that love books. a great way to get kids interested in reading because they can cook a recipe along with it. majority are adult novels but there are some children related ones. it's also a great resource for other books to read!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Keri

    My favorite part of this book are the quotations throughout, they are wonderful and I want to save every one of them to remember. The short excerpts of the novels are lovely and some of the recipes seem delicious. A fun read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

    This book gave me ideas about new things to cook, and new books to read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    Ichabod's flapjacks, anyone?

  23. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    The quotes are delicous as the recipes.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Delicious read. Pun totally intended.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mckinley

    Some great recipes. See Fictitious Dishes by Dinah Fried for non-recipe photos of foods from books.

  26. 4 out of 5

    J F

    Please try something akin ... but more "historical". I'm not quite sure what I mean, except to say that I'm a bibliophile of "classics" (both European and not) ...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I love this book!!! Full of love, laughter and good food!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    I enjoyed reading the food-related quotes in this book and the accompanying recipes. I wish the book had more pictures, however. I rarely make a recipe from a cookbook unless it has a picture.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Marian

    Starts with quotes from Little black Sambo and a pancake recipe and near the end a recipe for moon pies! What's not to love, and it had lots of quotes about food and recipes in between..

  30. 4 out of 5

    Erika Nerdypants

    I love books and I love cooking and food, so of course this was delightful. I haven't tried any recipes yet, as I only got this book yesterday, but I've earmarked a few.

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